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SQLite training in Houston TX on 2019-11-05 (details)
Part of the 2019 Tcl Conference

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Overview
Comment:Add the "Obtaining The Code" subsection in the top-level README.md file. No changes to code.
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SHA3-256: b1b1aa8b69aa80c83aec3380565f0b4ec0b6a6e033537becee098872da362e9a
User & Date: drh 2017-03-15 19:11:29
Context
2017-03-15
20:27
Updates to README files under the ext/ hierarchy. No changes to code. check-in: 029bc5d2 user: drh tags: trunk
19:11
Add the "Obtaining The Code" subsection in the top-level README.md file. No changes to code. check-in: b1b1aa8b user: drh tags: trunk
14:20
Mention the ".selftest" command in the ".help" output of the CLI. check-in: 37f766db user: drh tags: trunk
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engine.  Some test scripts are also include.  However, many other test scripts
and most of the documentation are managed separately.

If you are reading this on a Git mirror someplace, you are doing it wrong.
The [official repository](https://www.sqlite.org/src/) is better.  Go there
now.











































## Compiling

First create a directory in which to place
the build products.  It is recommended, but not required, that the
build directory be separate from the source directory.  Cd into the
build directory and then from the build directory run the configure
script found at the root of the source tree.  Then run "make".

For example:

    tar xzf sqlite.tar.gz    ;#  Unpack the source tree into "sqlite"
    mkdir bld                ;#  Build will occur in a sibling directory
    cd bld                   ;#  Change to the build directory
    ../sqlite/configure      ;#  Run the configure script
    make                     ;#  Run the makefile.
    make sqlite3.c           ;#  Build the "amalgamation" source file
    make test                ;#  Run some tests (requires Tcl)

See the makefile for additional targets.

The configure script uses autoconf 2.61 and libtool.  If the configure
script does not work out for you, there is a generic makefile named
"Makefile.linux-gcc" in the top directory of the source tree that you
can copy and edit to suit your needs.  Comments on the generic makefile
................................................................................
On Windows, all applicable build products can be compiled with MSVC.
First open the command prompt window associated with the desired compiler
version (e.g. "Developer Command Prompt for VS2013").  Next, use NMAKE
with the provided "Makefile.msc" to build one of the supported targets.

For example:

    mkdir bld
    cd bld
    nmake /f Makefile.msc TOP=..\sqlite
    nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.c TOP=..\sqlite
    nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.dll TOP=..\sqlite
    nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.exe TOP=..\sqlite
    nmake /f Makefile.msc test TOP=..\sqlite

There are several build options that can be set via the NMAKE command
line.  For example, to build for WinRT, simply add "FOR_WINRT=1" argument
to the "sqlite3.dll" command line above.  When debugging into the SQLite
code, adding the "DEBUG=1" argument to one of the above command lines is
recommended.








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engine.  Some test scripts are also include.  However, many other test scripts
and most of the documentation are managed separately.

If you are reading this on a Git mirror someplace, you are doing it wrong.
The [official repository](https://www.sqlite.org/src/) is better.  Go there
now.

## Obtaining The Code

SQLite sources are managed using the
[Fossil](https://www.fossil-scm.org/), a distributed version control system
that was specifically designed to support SQLite development.
If you do not want to use Fossil, you can download tarballs or ZIP
archives as follows:

  *  Lastest trunk check-in:
     <https://www.sqlite.org/src/tarball/sqlite.tar.gz> or
     <https://www.sqlite.org/src/zip/sqlite.zip>.

  *  Latest release:
     <https://www.sqlite.org/src/tarball/sqlite.tar.gz?r=release> or
     <https://www.sqlite.org/src/zip/sqlite.zip?r=release>.

  *  For other check-ins, substitute an appropriate branch name or
     tag or hash prefix for "release" in the URLs of the previous
     bullet.  Or browse the [timeline](https://www.sqlite.org/src/timeline)
     to locate the check-in desired, click on its information page link,
     then click on the "Tarball" or "ZIP Archive" links on the information
     page.

If you do want to use Fossil to check out the source tree, 
first install Fossil version 2.0 or later.
(Source tarballs and precompiled binaries available
[here](https://www.fossil-scm.org/fossil/uv/download.html).)
Then run commands like this:

        mkdir ~/sqlite
        cd ~/sqlite
        fossil clone https://www.sqlite.org/src sqlite.fossil
        fossil open sqlite.fossil
    
After setting up a repository using the steps above, you can always
update to the lastest version using:

        fossil update trunk   ;# latest trunk check-in
        fossil update release ;# latest official release

Or type "fossil ui" to get a web-based user interface.

## Compiling

First create a directory in which to place
the build products.  It is recommended, but not required, that the
build directory be separate from the source directory.  Cd into the
build directory and then from the build directory run the configure
script found at the root of the source tree.  Then run "make".

For example:

        tar xzf sqlite.tar.gz    ;#  Unpack the source tree into "sqlite"
        mkdir bld                ;#  Build will occur in a sibling directory
        cd bld                   ;#  Change to the build directory
        ../sqlite/configure      ;#  Run the configure script
        make                     ;#  Run the makefile.
        make sqlite3.c           ;#  Build the "amalgamation" source file
        make test                ;#  Run some tests (requires Tcl)

See the makefile for additional targets.

The configure script uses autoconf 2.61 and libtool.  If the configure
script does not work out for you, there is a generic makefile named
"Makefile.linux-gcc" in the top directory of the source tree that you
can copy and edit to suit your needs.  Comments on the generic makefile
................................................................................
On Windows, all applicable build products can be compiled with MSVC.
First open the command prompt window associated with the desired compiler
version (e.g. "Developer Command Prompt for VS2013").  Next, use NMAKE
with the provided "Makefile.msc" to build one of the supported targets.

For example:

        mkdir bld
        cd bld
        nmake /f Makefile.msc TOP=..\sqlite
        nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.c TOP=..\sqlite
        nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.dll TOP=..\sqlite
        nmake /f Makefile.msc sqlite3.exe TOP=..\sqlite
        nmake /f Makefile.msc test TOP=..\sqlite

There are several build options that can be set via the NMAKE command
line.  For example, to build for WinRT, simply add "FOR_WINRT=1" argument
to the "sqlite3.dll" command line above.  When debugging into the SQLite
code, adding the "DEBUG=1" argument to one of the above command lines is
recommended.