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SQLite training in Houston TX on 2019-11-05 (details)
Part of the 2019 Tcl Conference

Artifact b8f5286879315d5b7f4cc5ead1afda4846f0c0bb:


# 2010 September 25
#
# The author disclaims copyright to this source code.  In place of
# a legal notice, here is a blessing:
#
#    May you do good and not evil.
#    May you find forgiveness for yourself and forgive others.
#    May you share freely, never taking more than you give.
#
#***********************************************************************
#
# This file implements tests to verify that the "testable statements" in 
# the lang_createtable.html document are correct.
#

set testdir [file dirname $argv0]
source $testdir/tester.tcl

set ::testprefix e_createtable

# Test organization:
#
#   e_createtable-0.*: Test that the syntax diagrams are correct.
#
#   e_createtable-1.*: Test statements related to table and database names, 
#       the TEMP and TEMPORARY keywords, and the IF NOT EXISTS clause.
#
#   e_createtable-2.*: Test "CREATE TABLE AS" statements.
#

proc do_createtable_tests {nm args} {
  uplevel do_select_tests [list e_createtable-$nm] $args
}


#-------------------------------------------------------------------------
# This command returns a serialized tcl array mapping from the name of
# each attached database to a list of tables in that database. For example,
# if the database schema is created with:
#
#   CREATE TABLE t1(x);
#   CREATE TEMP TABLE t2(x);
#   CREATE TEMP TABLE t3(x);
#
# Then this command returns "main t1 temp {t2 t3}".
#
proc table_list {} {
  set res [list]
  db eval { pragma database_list } a {
    set dbname $a(name)
    set master $a(name).sqlite_master
    if {$dbname == "temp"} { set master sqlite_temp_master }
    lappend res $dbname [
      db eval "SELECT DISTINCT tbl_name FROM $master ORDER BY tbl_name"
    ]
  }
  set res
}


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-25262-01881 -- syntax diagram type-name
#
do_createtable_tests 0.1.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables
} {
  1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one)"                        {}
  2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one two)"                    {}
  3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one two three)"              {}
  4   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one two three four)"         {}
  5   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one two three four(14))"     {}
  6   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one two three four(14, 22))" {}
  7   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 var(+14, -22.3))"            {}
  8   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 var(1.0e10))"                {}
}
do_createtable_tests 0.1.2 -error {
  near "%s": syntax error
} {
  1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 one(number))"                {number}
}


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18762-12428 -- syntax diagram column-constraint
#
#   Note: Not shown in the syntax diagram is the "NULL" constraint. This
#         is the opposite of "NOT NULL" - it implies that the column may
#         take a NULL value. This is the default anyway, so this type of
#         constraint is rarely used.
#
do_createtable_tests 0.2.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables 
  execsql { CREATE TABLE t2(x PRIMARY KEY) }
} {
  1.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text PRIMARY KEY)"                         {}
  1.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text PRIMARY KEY ASC)"                     {}
  1.3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text PRIMARY KEY DESC)"                    {}
  1.4   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT cons PRIMARY KEY DESC)"    {}

  2.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text NOT NULL)"                            {}
  2.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT nm NOT NULL)"              {}
  2.3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text NULL)"                                {}
  2.4   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT nm NULL)"                  {}

  3.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text UNIQUE)"                              {}
  3.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT un UNIQUE)"                {}

  4.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CHECK(c1!=0))"                        {}
  4.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT chk CHECK(c1!=0))"         {}

  5.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text DEFAULT 1)"                           {}
  5.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text DEFAULT -1)"                          {}
  5.3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text DEFAULT +1)"                          {}
  5.4   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text DEFAULT -45.8e22)"                    {}
  5.5   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text DEFAULT (1+1))"                       {}
  5.6   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT \"1 2\" DEFAULT (1+1))"    {}

  6.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text COLLATE nocase)"        {}
  6.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 text CONSTRAINT 'a x' COLLATE nocase)"     {}

  7.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 REFERENCES t2)"                            {}
  7.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1 CONSTRAINT abc REFERENCES t2)"             {}

  8.1   {
    CREATE TABLE t1(c1 
      PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL UNIQUE CHECK(c1 IS 'ten') DEFAULT 123 REFERENCES t1
    );
  } {}
  8.2   {
    CREATE TABLE t1(c1 
      REFERENCES t1 DEFAULT 123 CHECK(c1 IS 'ten') UNIQUE NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY 
    );
  } {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-17905-31923 -- syntax diagram table-constraint
#
do_createtable_tests 0.3.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables 
  execsql { CREATE TABLE t2(x PRIMARY KEY) }
} {
  1.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, PRIMARY KEY(c1))"                         {}
  1.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, PRIMARY KEY(c1, c2))"                     {}
  1.3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, PRIMARY KEY(c1, c2) ON CONFLICT IGNORE)"  {}

  2.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, UNIQUE(c1))"                              {}
  2.2   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, UNIQUE(c1, c2))"                          {}
  2.3   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, UNIQUE(c1, c2) ON CONFLICT IGNORE)"       {}

  3.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, CHECK(c1 IS NOT c2))"                     {}

  4.1   "CREATE TABLE t1(c1, c2, FOREIGN KEY(c1) REFERENCES t2)"           {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18765-31171 -- syntax diagram column-def
#
do_createtable_tests 0.4.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables 
} {
  1     {CREATE TABLE t1(
           col1,
           col2 TEXT,
           col3 INTEGER UNIQUE,
           col4 VARCHAR(10, 10) PRIMARY KEY,
           "name with spaces" REFERENCES t1
         );
        } {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-59573-11075 -- syntax diagram create-table-stmt
#
do_createtable_tests 0.5.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables 
  execsql { CREATE TABLE t2(a, b, c) }
} {
  1     "CREATE TABLE t1(a, b, c)"                                    {}
  2     "CREATE TEMP TABLE t1(a, b, c)"                               {}
  3     "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE t1(a, b, c)"                          {}
  4     "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1(a, b, c)"                      {}
  5     "CREATE TEMP TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1(a, b, c)"                 {}
  6     "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1(a, b, c)"            {}

  7     "CREATE TABLE main.t1(a, b, c)"                               {}
  8     "CREATE TEMP TABLE temp.t1(a, b, c)"                          {}
  9     "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp.t1(a, b, c)"                     {}
  10    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS main.t1(a, b, c)"                 {}
  11    "CREATE TEMP TABLE IF NOT EXISTS temp.t1(a, b, c)"            {}
  12    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE IF NOT EXISTS temp.t1(a, b, c)"       {}

  13    "CREATE TABLE t1 AS SELECT * FROM t2"                         {}
  14    "CREATE TEMP TABLE t1 AS SELECT c, b, a FROM t2"              {}
  15    "CREATE TABLE t1 AS SELECT count(*), max(b), min(a) FROM t2"  {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-32138-02228 -- syntax diagram foreign-key-clause
#
#   1:         Explicit parent-key columns.
#   2:         Implicit child-key columns.
#
#   1:         MATCH FULL
#   2:         MATCH PARTIAL
#   3:         MATCH SIMPLE
#   4:         MATCH STICK
#   5:         
#
#   1:         ON DELETE SET NULL
#   2:         ON DELETE SET DEFAULT
#   3:         ON DELETE CASCADE
#   4:         ON DELETE RESTRICT
#   5:         ON DELETE NO ACTION
#   6:
#
#   1:         ON UPDATE SET NULL
#   2:         ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT
#   3:         ON UPDATE CASCADE
#   4:         ON UPDATE RESTRICT
#   5:         ON UPDATE NO ACTION
#   6:
#
#   1:         NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
#   2:         NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
#   3:         NOT DEFERRABLE
#   4:         DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
#   5:         DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
#   6:         DEFERRABLE
#   7:         
#
do_createtable_tests 0.6.1 -repair {
  drop_all_tables 
  execsql { CREATE TABLE t2(x PRIMARY KEY, y) }
  execsql { CREATE TABLE t3(i, j, UNIQUE(i, j) ) }
} {
  11146 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH FULL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE RESTRICT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  11412 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE SET NULL MATCH FULL 
    NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  12135 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE CASCADE DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  12427 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT 
  )} {}
  12446 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE RESTRICT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  12522 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  13133 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE CASCADE NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  13216 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE SET DEFAULT ON UPDATE SET NULL DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  13263 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE SET DEFAULT  NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  13421 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
  )} {}
  13432 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE CASCADE NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  13523 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  14336 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH STICK 
    ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  14611 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) MATCH STICK 
    ON UPDATE SET NULL NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
  )} {}
  15155 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x)
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE NO ACTION DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  15453 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE NO ACTION NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  15661 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2(x) NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
  )} {}
  21115 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH FULL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE SET NULL DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  21123 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH FULL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  21217 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH FULL ON DELETE SET DEFAULT ON UPDATE SET NULL 
  )} {}
  21362 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH FULL 
    ON DELETE CASCADE NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  22143 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE RESTRICT NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  22156 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH PARTIAL 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE NO ACTION DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  22327 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH PARTIAL ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT 
  )} {}
  22663 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH PARTIAL NOT DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  23236 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH SIMPLE 
    ON DELETE SET DEFAULT ON UPDATE CASCADE DEFERRABLE
  )} {}
  24155 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH STICK 
    ON DELETE SET NULL ON UPDATE NO ACTION DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  24522 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH STICK 
    ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT NOT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  24625 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 MATCH STICK 
    ON UPDATE SET DEFAULT DEFERRABLE INITIALLY IMMEDIATE
  )} {}
  25454 { CREATE TABLE t1(a 
    REFERENCES t2 
    ON DELETE RESTRICT ON UPDATE NO ACTION DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
  )} {}
}

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Test cases e_createtable-1.* - test statements related to table and
# database names, the TEMP and TEMPORARY keywords, and the IF NOT EXISTS
# clause.
#
drop_all_tables
forcedelete test.db2 test.db3

do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.0 {
  ATTACH 'test.db2' AS auxa;
  ATTACH 'test.db3' AS auxb;
} {}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-17899-04554 Table names that begin with "sqlite_" are
# reserved for internal use. It is an error to attempt to create a table
# with a name that starts with "sqlite_".
#
do_createtable_tests 1.1.1 -error {
  object name reserved for internal use: %s
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE sqlite_abc(a, b, c)"        sqlite_abc
  2    "CREATE TABLE temp.sqlite_helloworld(x)"  sqlite_helloworld
  3    {CREATE TABLE auxa."sqlite__"(x, y)}      sqlite__
  4    {CREATE TABLE auxb."sqlite_"(z)}          sqlite_
  5    {CREATE TABLE "SQLITE_TBL"(z)}            SQLITE_TBL
}
do_createtable_tests 1.1.2 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE sqlit_abc(a, b, c)"         {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE temp.sqlitehelloworld(x)"   {}
  3    {CREATE TABLE auxa."sqlite"(x, y)}        {}
  4    {CREATE TABLE auxb."sqlite-"(z)}          {}
  5    {CREATE TABLE "SQLITE-TBL"(z)}            {}
}


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-10195-31023 If a <database-name> is specified, it
# must be either "main", "temp", or the name of an attached database.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-39822-07822 In this case the new table is created in
# the named database.
#
#   Test cases 1.2.* test the first of the two requirements above. The
#   second is verified by cases 1.3.*.
#
do_createtable_tests 1.2.1 -error {
  unknown database %s
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE george.t1(a, b)"            george
  2    "CREATE TABLE _.t1(a, b)"                 _
}
do_createtable_tests 1.2.2 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE main.abc(a, b, c)"          {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE temp.helloworld(x)"         {}
  3    {CREATE TABLE auxa."t 1"(x, y)}           {}
  4    {CREATE TABLE auxb.xyz(z)}                {}
}
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 1.3 -tclquery {
  unset -nocomplain X
  array set X [table_list]
  list $X(main) $X(temp) $X(auxa) $X(auxb)
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE main.abc(a, b, c)"  {abc {} {} {}}
  2    "CREATE TABLE main.t1(a, b, c)"   {{abc t1} {} {} {}}
  3    "CREATE TABLE temp.tmp(a, b, c)"  {{abc t1} tmp {} {}}
  4    "CREATE TABLE auxb.tbl(x, y)"     {{abc t1} tmp {} tbl}
  5    "CREATE TABLE auxb.t1(k, v)"      {{abc t1} tmp {} {t1 tbl}}
  6    "CREATE TABLE auxa.next(c, d)"    {{abc t1} tmp next {t1 tbl}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18895-27365 If the "TEMP" or "TEMPORARY" keyword occurs
# between the "CREATE" and "TABLE" then the new table is created in the
# temp database.
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 1.4 -tclquery {
  unset -nocomplain X
  array set X [table_list]
  list $X(main) $X(temp) $X(auxa) $X(auxb)
} {
  1    "CREATE TEMP TABLE t1(a, b)"      {{} t1 {} {}}
  2    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE t2(a, b)" {{} {t1 t2} {} {}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-49439-47561 It is an error to specify both a
# <database-name> and the TEMP or TEMPORARY keyword, unless the
# <database-name> is "temp".
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 1.5.1 -error {
  temporary table name must be unqualified
} {
  1    "CREATE TEMP TABLE main.t1(a, b)"        {}
  2    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE auxa.t2(a, b)"   {}
  3    "CREATE TEMP TABLE auxb.t3(a, b)"        {}
  4    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE main.xxx(x)"     {}
}
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 1.5.2 -tclquery {
  unset -nocomplain X
  array set X [table_list]
  list $X(main) $X(temp) $X(auxa) $X(auxb)
} {
  1    "CREATE TEMP TABLE temp.t1(a, b)"        {{} t1 {} {}}
  2    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp.t2(a, b)"   {{} {t1 t2} {} {}}
  3    "CREATE TEMP TABLE TEMP.t3(a, b)"        {{} {t1 t2 t3} {} {}}
  4    "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE TEMP.xxx(x)"     {{} {t1 t2 t3 xxx} {} {}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-00917-09393 If no database name is specified and the
# TEMP keyword is not present then the table is created in the main
# database.
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 1.6 -tclquery {
  unset -nocomplain X
  array set X [table_list]
  list $X(main) $X(temp) $X(auxa) $X(auxb)
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t1(a, b)"   {t1 {} {} {}}
  2    "CREATE TABLE t2(a, b)"   {{t1 t2} {} {} {}}
  3    "CREATE TABLE t3(a, b)"   {{t1 t2 t3} {} {} {}}
  4    "CREATE TABLE xxx(x)"     {{t1 t2 t3 xxx} {} {} {}}
}

drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.7.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x, y);
  CREATE INDEX i1 ON t1(x);
  CREATE VIEW  v1 AS SELECT * FROM t1;

  CREATE TABLE auxa.tbl1(x, y);
  CREATE INDEX auxa.idx1 ON tbl1(x);
  CREATE VIEW auxa.view1 AS SELECT * FROM tbl1;
} {}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-01232-54838 It is usually an error to attempt to create
# a new table in a database that already contains a table, index or view
# of the same name.
#
#   Test cases 1.7.1.* verify that creating a table in a database with a
#   table/index/view of the same name does fail. 1.7.2.* tests that creating
#   a table with the same name as a table/index/view in a different database
#   is Ok.
#
do_createtable_tests 1.7.1 -error { %s } {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t1(a, b)"   {{table t1 already exists}}
  2    "CREATE TABLE i1(a, b)"   {{there is already an index named i1}}
  3    "CREATE TABLE v1(a, b)"   {{table v1 already exists}}
  4    "CREATE TABLE auxa.tbl1(a, b)"   {{table tbl1 already exists}}
  5    "CREATE TABLE auxa.idx1(a, b)"   {{there is already an index named idx1}}
  6    "CREATE TABLE auxa.view1(a, b)"  {{table view1 already exists}}
}
do_createtable_tests 1.7.2 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE auxa.t1(a, b)"   {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE auxa.i1(a, b)"   {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE auxa.v1(a, b)"   {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE tbl1(a, b)"      {}
  5    "CREATE TABLE idx1(a, b)"      {}
  6    "CREATE TABLE view1(a, b)"     {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-33917-24086 However, if the "IF NOT EXISTS" clause is
# specified as part of the CREATE TABLE statement and a table or view of
# the same name already exists, the CREATE TABLE command simply has no
# effect (and no error message is returned).
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.8.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x, y);
  CREATE INDEX i1 ON t1(x);
  CREATE VIEW  v1 AS SELECT * FROM t1;
  CREATE TABLE auxa.tbl1(x, y);
  CREATE INDEX auxa.idx1 ON tbl1(x);
  CREATE VIEW auxa.view1 AS SELECT * FROM tbl1;
} {}
do_createtable_tests 1.8 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1(a, b)"          {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS auxa.tbl1(a, b)"   {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS v1(a, b)"          {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS auxa.view1(a, b)"  {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-16465-40078 An error is still returned if the table
# cannot be created because of an existing index, even if the "IF NOT
# EXISTS" clause is specified.
#
do_createtable_tests 1.9 -error { %s } {
  1    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS i1(a, b)"   
       {{there is already an index named i1}}
  2    "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS auxa.idx1(a, b)"   
       {{there is already an index named idx1}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-05513-33819 It is not an error to create a table that
# has the same name as an existing trigger.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.10.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x, y);
  CREATE TABLE auxb.t2(x, y);

  CREATE TRIGGER tr1 AFTER INSERT ON t1 BEGIN
    SELECT 1;
  END;
  CREATE TRIGGER auxb.tr2 AFTER INSERT ON t2 BEGIN
    SELECT 1;
  END;
} {}
do_createtable_tests 1.10 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE tr1(a, b)"          {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE tr2(a, b)"          {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE auxb.tr1(a, b)"     {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE auxb.tr2(a, b)"     {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-22283-14179 Tables are removed using the DROP TABLE
# statement.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.11.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(a, b);
  CREATE TABLE t2(a, b);
  CREATE TABLE auxa.t3(a, b);
  CREATE TABLE auxa.t4(a, b);
} {}

do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.11.1.1 {
  SELECT * FROM t1;
  SELECT * FROM t2;
  SELECT * FROM t3;
  SELECT * FROM t4;
} {}
do_execsql_test  e_createtable-1.11.1.2 { DROP TABLE t1 } {}
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-1.11.1.3 { 
  SELECT * FROM t1 
} {1 {no such table: t1}}
do_execsql_test  e_createtable-1.11.1.4 { DROP TABLE t3 } {}
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-1.11.1.5 { 
  SELECT * FROM t3 
} {1 {no such table: t3}}

do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.11.2.1 {
  SELECT name FROM sqlite_master;
  SELECT name FROM auxa.sqlite_master;
} {t2 t4}
do_execsql_test  e_createtable-1.11.2.2 { DROP TABLE t2 } {}
do_execsql_test  e_createtable-1.11.2.3 { DROP TABLE t4 } {}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-1.11.2.4 {
  SELECT name FROM sqlite_master;
  SELECT name FROM auxa.sqlite_master;
} {}

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Test cases e_createtable-2.* - test statements related to the CREATE
# TABLE AS ... SELECT statement.
#

# Three Tcl commands:
#
#   select_column_names SQL
#     The argument must be a SELECT statement. Return a list of the names
#     of the columns of the result-set that would be returned by executing
#     the SELECT.
#
#   table_column_names TBL
#     The argument must be a table name. Return a list of column names, from
#     left to right, for the table.
#
#   table_column_decltypes TBL
#     The argument must be a table name. Return a list of column declared
#     types, from left to right, for the table.
#
proc sci {select cmd} {
  set res [list]
  set STMT [sqlite3_prepare_v2 db $select -1 dummy]
  for {set i 0} {$i < [sqlite3_column_count $STMT]} {incr i} {
    lappend res [$cmd $STMT $i]
  }
  sqlite3_finalize $STMT
  set res
}
proc tci {tbl cmd} { sci "SELECT * FROM $tbl" $cmd }
proc select_column_names    {sql} { sci $sql sqlite3_column_name }
proc table_column_names     {tbl} { tci $tbl sqlite3_column_name }
proc table_column_decltypes {tbl} { tci $tbl sqlite3_column_decltype }

# Create a database schema. This schema is used by tests 2.1.* through 2.3.*.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(a, b, c);
  CREATE TABLE t2(d, e, f);
  CREATE TABLE t3(g BIGINT, h VARCHAR(10));
  CREATE TABLE t4(i BLOB, j ANYOLDATA);
  CREATE TABLE t5(k FLOAT, l INTEGER);
  CREATE TABLE t6(m DEFAULT 10, n DEFAULT 5, PRIMARY KEY(m, n));
  CREATE TABLE t7(x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY);
  CREATE TABLE t8(o COLLATE nocase DEFAULT 'abc');
  CREATE TABLE t9(p NOT NULL, q DOUBLE CHECK (q!=0), r STRING UNIQUE);
} {}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-64828-59568 The table has the same number of columns as
# the rows returned by the SELECT statement. The name of each column is
# the same as the name of the corresponding column in the result set of
# the SELECT statement.
#
do_createtable_tests 2.1 -tclquery {
  table_column_names x1
} -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE x1 }
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t1"                     {a b c}
  2    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT c, b, a FROM t1"               {c b a}
  3    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t1, t2"                 {a b c d e f}
  4    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT count(*) FROM t1"              {count(*)}
  5    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT count(a) AS a, max(b) FROM t1" {a max(b)}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-37111-22855 The declared type of each column is
# determined by the expression affinity of the corresponding expression
# in the result set of the SELECT statement, as follows: Expression
# Affinity Column Declared Type TEXT "TEXT" NUMERIC "NUM" INTEGER "INT"
# REAL "REAL" NONE "" (empty string)
#
do_createtable_tests 2.2 -tclquery {
  table_column_decltypes x1
} -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE x1 }
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT a FROM t1"     {""}
  2    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t3"     {INT TEXT}
  3    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t4"     {"" NUM}
  4    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t5"     {REAL INT}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-16667-09772 A table created using CREATE TABLE AS has
# no PRIMARY KEY and no constraints of any kind. The default value of
# each column is NULL. The default collation sequence for each column of
# the new table is BINARY.
#
#   The following tests create tables based on SELECT statements that read
#   from tables that have primary keys, constraints and explicit default 
#   collation sequences. None of this is transfered to the definition of
#   the new table as stored in the sqlite_master table.
#
#   Tests 2.3.2.* show that the default value of each column is NULL.
#
do_createtable_tests 2.3.1 -query {
  SELECT sql FROM sqlite_master ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE x1 AS SELECT * FROM t6" {{CREATE TABLE x1(m,n)}}
  2    "CREATE TABLE x2 AS SELECT * FROM t7" {{CREATE TABLE x2(x INT)}}
  3    "CREATE TABLE x3 AS SELECT * FROM t8" {{CREATE TABLE x3(o)}}
  4    "CREATE TABLE x4 AS SELECT * FROM t9" {{CREATE TABLE x4(p,q REAL,r NUM)}}
}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.3.2.1 {
  INSERT INTO x1 DEFAULT VALUES;
  INSERT INTO x2 DEFAULT VALUES;
  INSERT INTO x3 DEFAULT VALUES;
  INSERT INTO x4 DEFAULT VALUES;
} {}
db nullvalue null
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.3.2.2 { SELECT * FROM x1 } {null null}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.3.2.3 { SELECT * FROM x2 } {null}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.3.2.4 { SELECT * FROM x3 } {null}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.3.2.5 { SELECT * FROM x4 } {null null null}
db nullvalue {}

drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.4.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x, y);
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('i',   'one');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('ii',  'two');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('iii', 'three');
} {}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-24153-28352 Tables created using CREATE TABLE AS are
# initially populated with the rows of data returned by the SELECT
# statement.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-08224-30249 Rows are assigned contiguously ascending
# rowid values, starting with 1, in the order that they are returned by
# the SELECT statement.
#
#   Each test case below is specified as the name of a table to create
#   using "CREATE TABLE ... AS SELECT ..." and a SELECT statement to use in
#   creating it. The table is created. 
#
#   Test cases 2.4.*.1 check that after it has been created, the data in the
#   table is the same as the data returned by the SELECT statement executed as
#   a standalone command, verifying the first testable statement above.
#
#   Test cases 2.4.*.2 check that the rowids were allocated contiguously
#   as required by the second testable statement above. That the rowids
#   from the contiguous block were allocated to rows in the order rows are
#   returned by the SELECT statement is verified by 2.4.*.1.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-32365-09043 A "CREATE TABLE ... AS SELECT" statement
# creates and populates a database table based on the results of a
# SELECT statement.
#
#   The above is also considered to be tested by the following. It is
#   clear that tables are being created and populated by the command in
#   question.
#
foreach {tn tbl select} {
  1   x1   "SELECT * FROM t1"
  2   x2   "SELECT * FROM t1 ORDER BY x DESC"
  3   x3   "SELECT * FROM t1 ORDER BY x ASC"
} {
  # Create the table using a "CREATE TABLE ... AS SELECT ..." command.
  execsql [subst {CREATE TABLE $tbl AS $select}]

  # Check that the rows inserted into the table, sorted in ascending rowid
  # order, match those returned by executing the SELECT statement as a
  # standalone command.
  do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.4.$tn.1 [subst {
    SELECT * FROM $tbl ORDER BY rowid;
  }] [execsql $select]

  # Check that the rowids in the new table are a contiguous block starting
  # with rowid 1. Note that this will fail if SELECT statement $select 
  # returns 0 rows (as max(rowid) will be NULL).
  do_execsql_test e_createtable-2.4.$tn.2 [subst {
    SELECT min(rowid), count(rowid)==max(rowid) FROM $tbl
  }] {1 1}
}

#--------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Test cases for column defintions in CREATE TABLE statements that do not
# use a SELECT statement. Not including data constraints. In other words,
# tests for the specification of:
#
#   * declared types,
#   * default values, and
#   * default collation sequences.
#

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-27219-49057 Unlike most SQL databases, SQLite does not
# restrict the type of data that may be inserted into a column based on
# the columns declared type.
#
#   Test this by creating a few tables with varied declared types, then
#   inserting various different types of values into them.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.1.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x VARCHAR(10), y INTEGER, z DOUBLE);
  CREATE TABLE t2(a DATETIME, b STRING, c REAL);
  CREATE TABLE t3(o, t);
} {}

# value type -> declared column type
# ----------------------------------
# integer    -> VARCHAR(10)
# string     -> INTEGER
# blob       -> DOUBLE
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.1.1 {
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(14, 'quite a lengthy string', X'555655');
  SELECT * FROM t1;
} {14 {quite a lengthy string} UVU}

# string     -> DATETIME
# integer    -> STRING
# time       -> REAL
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.1.2 {
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('not a datetime', 13, '12:41:59');
  SELECT * FROM t2;
} {{not a datetime} 13 12:41:59}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-10565-09557 The declared type of a column is used to
# determine the affinity of the column only.
#
#     Affinities are tested in more detail elsewhere (see document
#     datatype3.html). Here, just test that affinity transformations
#     consistent with the expected affinity of each column (based on
#     the declared type) appear to take place.
#
# Affinities of t1 (test cases 3.2.1.*): TEXT, INTEGER, REAL
# Affinities of t2 (test cases 3.2.2.*): NUMERIC, NUMERIC, REAL
# Affinities of t3 (test cases 3.2.3.*): NONE, NONE
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.2.0 { DELETE FROM t1; DELETE FROM t2; } {}

do_createtable_tests 3.2.1 -query {
  SELECT quote(x), quote(y), quote(z) FROM t1 ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1;
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(15,   '22.0', '14')"   {'15' 22 14.0}
  2   "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(22.0, 22.0, 22.0)"     {'22.0' 22 22.0}
}
do_createtable_tests 3.2.2 -query {
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b), quote(c) FROM t2 ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1;
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(15,   '22.0', '14')"   {15   22  14.0}
  2   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(22.0, 22.0, 22.0)"     {22   22  22.0}
}
do_createtable_tests 3.2.3 -query {
  SELECT quote(o), quote(t) FROM t3 ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1;
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('15', '22.0')"         {'15' '22.0'}
  2   "INSERT INTO t3 VALUES(15, 22.0)"             {15 22.0}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-42316-09582 If there is no explicit DEFAULT clause
# attached to a column definition, then the default value of the column
# is NULL.
#
#     None of the columns in table t1 have an explicit DEFAULT clause.
#     So testing that the default value of all columns in table t1 is
#     NULL serves to verify the above.
#     
do_createtable_tests 3.2.3 -query {
  SELECT quote(x), quote(y), quote(z) FROM t1
} -repair {
  execsql { DELETE FROM t1 }
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t1(x, y) VALUES('abc', 'xyz')"   {'abc' 'xyz' NULL}
  2   "INSERT INTO t1(x, z) VALUES('abc', 'xyz')"   {'abc' NULL 'xyz'}
  3   "INSERT INTO t1 DEFAULT VALUES"               {NULL NULL NULL}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-62940-43005 An explicit DEFAULT clause may specify that
# the default value is NULL, a string constant, a blob constant, a
# signed-number, or any constant expression enclosed in parentheses. An
# explicit default value may also be one of the special case-independent
# keywords CURRENT_TIME, CURRENT_DATE or CURRENT_TIMESTAMP.
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.3.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t4(
    a DEFAULT NULL,
    b DEFAULT 'string constant',
    c DEFAULT X'424C4F42',
    d DEFAULT 1,
    e DEFAULT -1,
    f DEFAULT 3.14,
    g DEFAULT -3.14,
    h DEFAULT ( substr('abcd', 0, 2) || 'cd' ),
    i DEFAULT CURRENT_TIME,
    j DEFAULT CURRENT_DATE,
    k DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
  );
} {}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-10288-43169 For the purposes of the DEFAULT clause, an
# expression is considered constant provided that it does not contain
# any sub-queries or string constants enclosed in double quotes.
#
do_createtable_tests 3.4.1 -error {
  default value of column [x] is not constant
} {
  1   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( (SELECT 1) ))}  {}
  2   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( "abc" ))}  {}
  3   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( 1 IN (SELECT 1) ))}  {}
  4   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( EXISTS (SELECT 1) ))}  {}
}
do_createtable_tests 3.4.2 -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE t5 }
} {
  1   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( 'abc' ))}  {}
  2   {CREATE TABLE t5(x DEFAULT ( 1 IN (1, 2, 3) ))}  {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18814-23501 Each time a row is inserted into the table
# by an INSERT statement that does not provide explicit values for all
# table columns the values stored in the new row are determined by their
# default values
#
#     Verify this with some assert statements for which all, some and no
#     columns lack explicit values.
#
set sqlite_current_time 1000000000
do_createtable_tests 3.5 -query {
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b), quote(c), quote(d), quote(e), quote(f), 
         quote(g), quote(h), quote(i), quote(j), quote(k)
  FROM t4 ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1;
} {
  1 "INSERT INTO t4 DEFAULT VALUES" {
    NULL {'string constant'} X'424C4F42' 1 -1 3.14 -3.14 
    'acd' '01:46:40' '2001-09-09' {'2001-09-09 01:46:40'}
  }

  2 "INSERT INTO t4(a, b, c) VALUES(1, 2, 3)" {
    1 2 3 1 -1 3.14 -3.14 'acd' '01:46:40' '2001-09-09' {'2001-09-09 01:46:40'}
  }

  3 "INSERT INTO t4(k, j, i) VALUES(1, 2, 3)" {
    NULL {'string constant'} X'424C4F42' 1 -1 3.14 -3.14 'acd' 3 2 1
  }

  4 "INSERT INTO t4(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k) VALUES(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)" {
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  }
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-12572-62501 If the default value of the column is a
# constant NULL, text, blob or signed-number value, then that value is
# used directly in the new row.
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.6.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t5(
    a DEFAULT NULL,  
    b DEFAULT 'text value',  
    c DEFAULT X'424C4F42',
    d DEFAULT -45678.6,
    e DEFAULT 394507
  );
} {}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.6.2 {
  INSERT INTO t5 DEFAULT VALUES;
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b), quote(c), quote(d), quote(e) FROM t5;
} {NULL {'text value'} X'424C4F42' -45678.6 394507}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-60616-50251 If the default value of a column is an
# expression in parentheses, then the expression is evaluated once for
# each row inserted and the results used in the new row.
#
#   Test case 3.6.4 demonstrates that the expression is evaluated 
#   separately for each row if the INSERT is an "INSERT INTO ... SELECT ..."
#   command.
#
set ::nextint 0
proc nextint {} { incr ::nextint }
db func nextint nextint

do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.7.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t6(a DEFAULT ( nextint() ), b DEFAULT ( nextint() ));
} {}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.7.2 {
  INSERT INTO t6 DEFAULT VALUES;
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b) FROM t6;
} {1 2}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.7.3 {
  INSERT INTO t6(a) VALUES('X');
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b) FROM t6;
} {1 2 'X' 3}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.7.4 {
  INSERT INTO t6(a) SELECT a FROM t6;
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b) FROM t6;
} {1 2 'X' 3 1 4 'X' 5}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18683-56219 If the default value of a column is
# CURRENT_TIME, CURRENT_DATE or CURRENT_DATETIME, then the value used in
# the new row is a text representation of the current UTC date and/or
# time.
#
#     This is difficult to test literally without knowing what time the 
#     user will run the tests. Instead, we test that the three cases
#     above set the value to the current date and/or time according to
#     the xCurrentTime() method of the VFS. Which is usually the same
#     as UTC. In this case, however, we instrument it to always return
#     a time equivalent to "2001-09-09 01:46:40 UTC".
#
set sqlite_current_time 1000000000
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.8.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t7(
    a DEFAULT CURRENT_TIME, 
    b DEFAULT CURRENT_DATE, 
    c DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
  );
} {}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.8.2 {
  INSERT INTO t7 DEFAULT VALUES;
  SELECT quote(a), quote(b), quote(c) FROM t7;
} {'01:46:40' '2001-09-09' {'2001-09-09 01:46:40'}}


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-62327-53843 For CURRENT_TIME, the format of the value
# is "HH:MM:SS".
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-03775-43471 For CURRENT_DATE, "YYYY-MM-DD".
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-07677-44926 The format for CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is
# "YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS".
#
#     The three above are demonstrated by tests 1, 2 and 3 below. 
#     Respectively.
#
do_createtable_tests 3.8.3 -query {
  SELECT a, b, c FROM t7 ORDER BY rowid DESC LIMIT 1;
} {
  1 "INSERT INTO t7(b, c) VALUES('x', 'y')" {01:46:40 x y}
  2 "INSERT INTO t7(c, a) VALUES('x', 'y')" {y 2001-09-09 x}
  3 "INSERT INTO t7(a, b) VALUES('x', 'y')" {x y {2001-09-09 01:46:40}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-55061-47754 The COLLATE clause specifies the name of a
# collating sequence to use as the default collation sequence for the
# column.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-40275-54363 If no COLLATE clause is specified, the
# default collation sequence is BINARY.
#
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3-9.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t8(a COLLATE nocase, b COLLATE rtrim, c COLLATE binary, d);
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES('abc',   'abc',   'abc',   'abc');
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES('abc  ', 'abc  ', 'abc  ', 'abc  ');
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES('ABC  ', 'ABC  ', 'ABC  ', 'ABC  ');
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES('ABC',   'ABC',   'ABC',   'ABC');
} {}
do_createtable_tests 3.9 {
  2    "SELECT a FROM t8 ORDER BY a, rowid"    {abc ABC {abc  } {ABC  }}
  3    "SELECT b FROM t8 ORDER BY b, rowid"    {{ABC  } ABC abc {abc  }}
  4    "SELECT c FROM t8 ORDER BY c, rowid"    {ABC {ABC  } abc {abc  }}
  5    "SELECT d FROM t8 ORDER BY d, rowid"    {ABC {ABC  } abc {abc  }}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-25473-20557 The number of columns in a table is limited
# by the SQLITE_MAX_COLUMN compile-time parameter.
#
proc columns {n} {
  set res [list]
  for {set i 0} {$i < $n} {incr i} { lappend res "c$i" }
  join $res ", "
}
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.10.1 [subst {
  CREATE TABLE t9([columns $::SQLITE_MAX_COLUMN]);
}] {}
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-3.10.2 [subst {
  CREATE TABLE t10([columns [expr $::SQLITE_MAX_COLUMN+1]]);
}] {1 {too many columns on t10}}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-27775-64721 Both of these limits can be lowered at
# runtime using the sqlite3_limit() C/C++ interface.
#
#   A 30,000 byte blob consumes 30,003 bytes of record space. A record 
#   that contains 3 such blobs consumes (30,000*3)+1 bytes of space. Tests
#   3.11.4 and 3.11.5, which verify that SQLITE_MAX_LENGTH may be lowered
#   at runtime, are based on this calculation.
#
sqlite3_limit db SQLITE_LIMIT_COLUMN 500
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.11.1 [subst {
  CREATE TABLE t10([columns 500]);
}] {}
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-3.11.2 [subst {
  CREATE TABLE t11([columns 501]);
}] {1 {too many columns on t11}}

# Check that it is not possible to raise the column limit above its 
# default compile time value.
#
sqlite3_limit db SQLITE_LIMIT_COLUMN [expr $::SQLITE_MAX_COLUMN+2]
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-3.11.3 [subst {
  CREATE TABLE t11([columns [expr $::SQLITE_MAX_COLUMN+1]]);
}] {1 {too many columns on t11}}

sqlite3_limit db SQLITE_LIMIT_LENGTH 90010
do_execsql_test e_createtable-3.11.4 {
  CREATE TABLE t12(a, b, c);
  INSERT INTO t12 VALUES(randomblob(30000),randomblob(30000),randomblob(30000));
} {}
do_catchsql_test e_createtable-3.11.5 {
  INSERT INTO t12 VALUES(randomblob(30001),randomblob(30000),randomblob(30000));
} {1 {string or blob too big}}

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Tests for statements regarding constraints (PRIMARY KEY, UNIQUE, NOT 
# NULL and CHECK constraints).
#

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-52382-54248 Each table in SQLite may have at most one
# PRIMARY KEY.
# 
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-18080-47271 If there is more than one PRIMARY KEY
# clause in a single CREATE TABLE statement, it is an error.
#
#     To test the two above, show that zero primary keys is Ok, one primary
#     key is Ok, and two or more primary keys is an error.
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 4.1.1 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t1(a, b, c)"                                        {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE t2(a PRIMARY KEY, b, c)"                            {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE t3(a, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(a))"                        {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE t4(a, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(c,b,a))"                    {}
}
do_createtable_tests 4.1.2 -error {
  table "t5" has more than one primary key
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t5(a PRIMARY KEY, b PRIMARY KEY, c)"                {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE t5(a, b PRIMARY KEY, c, PRIMARY KEY(a))"            {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE t5(a INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, b PRIMARY KEY, c)"        {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE t5(a INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(b, c))" {}
  5    "CREATE TABLE t5(a PRIMARY KEY, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(a))"            {}
  6    "CREATE TABLE t5(a INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(a))"    {}
}

proc table_pk {tbl} { 
  set pk [list]
  db eval "pragma table_info($tbl)" a {
    if {$a(pk)} { lappend pk $a(name) }
  }
  set pk
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-41411-18837 If the keywords PRIMARY KEY are added to a
# column definition, then the primary key for the table consists of that
# single column.
#
#     The above is tested by 4.2.1.*
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-31775-48204 Or, if a PRIMARY KEY clause is specified as
# a table-constraint, then the primary key of the table consists of the
# list of columns specified as part of the PRIMARY KEY clause.
#
#     The above is tested by 4.2.2.*
#
do_createtable_tests 4.2 -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE t5 }
} -tclquery {
  table_pk t5
} {
  1.1    "CREATE TABLE t5(a, b INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, c)"       {b}
  1.2    "CREATE TABLE t5(a PRIMARY KEY, b, c)"               {a}

  2.1    "CREATE TABLE t5(a, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(a))"           {a}
  2.2    "CREATE TABLE t5(a, b, c, PRIMARY KEY(c,b,a))"       {a b c}
  2.3    "CREATE TABLE t5(a, b INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, c)"       {b}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-33986-09410 Each row in a table with a primary key must
# feature a unique combination of values in its primary key columns.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-39102-06737 If an INSERT or UPDATE statement attempts
# to modify the table content so that two or more rows feature identical
# primary key values, it is a constraint violation.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test 4.3.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x PRIMARY KEY, y);
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(0,          'zero');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(45.5,       'one');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('brambles', 'two');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(X'ABCDEF',  'three');

  CREATE TABLE t2(x, y, PRIMARY KEY(x, y));
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0,          'zero');
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(45.5,       'one');
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('brambles', 'two');
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(X'ABCDEF',  'three');
} {}

do_createtable_tests 4.3.1 -error { %s not unique } {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(0, 0)"                 {"column x is"}
  2    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(45.5, 'abc')"          {"column x is"}
  3    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(0.0, 'abc')"           {"column x is"}
  4    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('brambles', 'abc')"    {"column x is"}
  5    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(X'ABCDEF', 'abc')"     {"column x is"}

  6    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0, 'zero')"            {"columns x, y are"}
  7    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(45.5, 'one')"          {"columns x, y are"}
  8    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0.0, 'zero')"          {"columns x, y are"}
  9    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('brambles', 'two')"    {"columns x, y are"}
  10   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(X'ABCDEF', 'three')"   {"columns x, y are"}
}
do_createtable_tests 4.3.2 {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(-1, 0)"                {}
  2    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(45.2, 'abc')"          {}
  3    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(0.01, 'abc')"          {}
  4    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('bramble', 'abc')"     {}
  5    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(X'ABCDEE', 'abc')"     {}

  6    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0, 0)"                 {}
  7    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(45.5, 'abc')"          {}
  8    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0.0, 'abc')"           {}
  9    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('brambles', 'abc')"    {}
  10   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(X'ABCDEF', 'abc')"     {}
}
do_createtable_tests 4.3.3 -error { %s not unique } {
  1    "UPDATE t1 SET x=0           WHERE y='two'"    {"column x is"}
  2    "UPDATE t1 SET x='brambles'  WHERE y='three'"  {"column x is"}
  3    "UPDATE t1 SET x=45.5        WHERE y='zero'"   {"column x is"}
  4    "UPDATE t1 SET x=X'ABCDEF'   WHERE y='one'"    {"column x is"}
  5    "UPDATE t1 SET x=0.0         WHERE y='three'"  {"column x is"}

  6    "UPDATE t2 SET x=0, y='zero' WHERE y='two'"    {"columns x, y are"}
  7    "UPDATE t2 SET x='brambles', y='two' WHERE y='three'"  
       {"columns x, y are"}
  8    "UPDATE t2 SET x=45.5, y='one' WHERE y='zero'" {"columns x, y are"}
  9    "UPDATE t2 SET x=X'ABCDEF', y='three' WHERE y='one'" 
       {"columns x, y are"}
  10   "UPDATE t2 SET x=0.0, y='zero'        WHERE y='three'"  
       {"columns x, y are"}
}


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-52572-02078 For the purposes of determining the
# uniqueness of primary key values, NULL values are considered distinct
# from all other values, including other NULLs.
#
do_createtable_tests 4.4 {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, 0)"              {}
  2    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, 0)"              {}
  3    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, 0)"              {}

  4    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, 'zero')"         {}
  5    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, 'one')"          {}
  6    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, 'two')"          {}
  7    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, 'three')"        {}

  8    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0, NULL)"              {}
  9    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(45.5, NULL)"           {}
  10   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0.0, NULL)"            {}
  11   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('brambles', NULL)"     {}
  12   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(X'ABCDEF', NULL)"      {}

  13   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, NULL)"           {}
  14   "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, NULL)"           {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-61866-38053 Unless the column is an INTEGER PRIMARY KEY
# SQLite allows NULL values in a PRIMARY KEY column.
#
#     If the column is an integer primary key, attempting to insert a NULL
#     into the column triggers the auto-increment behaviour. Attempting
#     to use UPDATE to set an ipk column to a NULL value is an error.
#
do_createtable_tests 4.5.1 {
  1    "SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x IS NULL"                   3
  2    "SELECT count(*) FROM t2 WHERE x IS NULL"                   6
  3    "SELECT count(*) FROM t2 WHERE y IS NULL"                   7
  4    "SELECT count(*) FROM t2 WHERE x IS NULL AND y IS NULL"     2
}
do_execsql_test 4.5.2 {
  CREATE TABLE t3(s, u INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, v);
  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES(1, NULL, 2);
  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('x', NULL, 'y');
  SELECT u FROM t3;
} {1 2}
do_catchsql_test 4.5.3 {
  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES(2, 5, 3);
  UPDATE t3 SET u = NULL WHERE s = 2;
} {1 {datatype mismatch}}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-00227-21080 A UNIQUE constraint is similar to a PRIMARY
# KEY constraint, except that a single table may have any number of
# UNIQUE constraints.
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 4.6 {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t1(a UNIQUE, b UNIQUE)"                       {}
  2    "CREATE TABLE t2(a UNIQUE, b, c, UNIQUE(c, b))"             {}
  3    "CREATE TABLE t3(a, b, c, UNIQUE(a), UNIQUE(b), UNIQUE(c))" {}
  4    "CREATE TABLE t4(a, b, c, UNIQUE(a, b, c))"                 {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-55240-58877 For each UNIQUE constraint on the table,
# each row must feature a unique combination of values in the columns
# identified by the UNIQUE constraint.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-47733-51480 If an INSERT or UPDATE statement attempts
# to modify the table content so that two or more rows feature identical
# values in a set of columns that are subject to a UNIQUE constraint, it
# is a constraint violation.
#
do_execsql_test 4.7.0 {
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1, 2);
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(4.3, 5.5);
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('reveal', 'variableness');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(X'123456', X'654321');

  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('xyx', 1, 1);
  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('xyx', 2, 1);
  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('uvw', 1, 1);
}
do_createtable_tests 4.7.1 -error { %s not unique } {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1, 'one')"             {{column a is}}
  2    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(4.3, 'two')"           {{column a is}}
  3    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('reveal', 'three')"    {{column a is}}
  4    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(X'123456', 'four')"    {{column a is}}

  5    "UPDATE t1 SET a = 1 WHERE rowid=2"           {{column a is}}
  6    "UPDATE t1 SET a = 4.3 WHERE rowid=3"         {{column a is}}
  7    "UPDATE t1 SET a = 'reveal' WHERE rowid=4"    {{column a is}}
  8    "UPDATE t1 SET a = X'123456' WHERE rowid=1"   {{column a is}}

  9    "INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('xyx', 1, 1)"          {{columns a, b, c are}}
  10   "INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('xyx', 2, 1)"          {{columns a, b, c are}}
  11   "INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('uvw', 1, 1)"          {{columns a, b, c are}}

  12   "UPDATE t4 SET a='xyx' WHERE rowid=3"         {{columns a, b, c are}}
  13   "UPDATE t4 SET b=1 WHERE rowid=2"             {{columns a, b, c are}}
  14   "UPDATE t4 SET a=0, b=0, c=0"                 {{columns a, b, c are}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-21289-11559 As with PRIMARY KEY constraints, for the
# purposes of UNIQUE constraints NULL values are considered distinct
# from all other values (including other NULLs).
#
do_createtable_tests 4.8 {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, NULL)"           {}
  2    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, NULL)"           {}
  3    "UPDATE t1 SET a = NULL"                      {}
  4    "UPDATE t1 SET b = NULL"                      {}

  5    "INSERT INTO t4 VALUES(NULL, NULL, NULL)"     {}
  6    "INSERT INTO t4 VALUES(NULL, NULL, NULL)"     {}
  7    "UPDATE t4 SET a = NULL"                      {}
  8    "UPDATE t4 SET b = NULL"                      {}
  9    "UPDATE t4 SET c = NULL"                      {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-26983-26377 INTEGER PRIMARY KEY columns aside, both
# UNIQUE and PRIMARY KEY constraints are implemented by creating an
# index in the database (in the same way as a "CREATE UNIQUE INDEX"
# statement would).
do_createtable_tests 4.9 -repair drop_all_tables -query {
  SELECT count(*) FROM sqlite_master WHERE type='index'
} {
  1    "CREATE TABLE t1(a TEXT PRIMARY KEY, b)"              1
  2    "CREATE TABLE t1(a INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, b)"           0
  3    "CREATE TABLE t1(a TEXT UNIQUE, b)"                   1
  4    "CREATE TABLE t1(a PRIMARY KEY, b TEXT UNIQUE)"       2
  5    "CREATE TABLE t1(a PRIMARY KEY, b, c, UNIQUE(c, b))"  2
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-02252-33116 Such an index is used like any other index
# in the database to optimize queries.
#
do_execsql_test 4.10.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(a, b PRIMARY KEY);
  CREATE TABLE t2(a, b, c, UNIQUE(b, c));
}
do_createtable_tests 4.10 {
  1    "EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE b = 5" 
       {0 0 0 {SEARCH TABLE t1 USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_t1_1 (b=?) (~1 rows)}}

  2    "EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT * FROM t2 ORDER BY b, c"
       {0 0 0 {SCAN TABLE t2 USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_t2_1 (~1000000 rows)}}

  3    "EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT * FROM t2 WHERE b=10 AND c>10"
       {0 0 0 {SEARCH TABLE t2 USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_t2_1 (b=? AND c>?) (~3 rows)}}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-45493-35653 A CHECK constraint may be attached to a
# column definition or specified as a table constraint. In practice it
# makes no difference.
#
#   All the tests that deal with CHECK constraints below (4.11.* and 
#   4.12.*) are run once for a table with the check constraint attached
#   to a column definition, and once with a table where the check 
#   condition is specified as a table constraint.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-55435-14303 Each time a new row is inserted into the
# table or an existing row is updated, the expression associated with
# each CHECK constraint is evaluated and cast to a NUMERIC value in the
# same way as a CAST expression. If the result is zero (integer value 0
# or real value 0.0), then a constraint violation has occurred.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test 4.11 {
  CREATE TABLE x1(a TEXT, b INTEGER CHECK( b>0 ));
  CREATE TABLE t1(a TEXT, b INTEGER, CHECK( b>0 ));
  INSERT INTO x1 VALUES('x', 'xx');
  INSERT INTO x1 VALUES('y', 'yy');
  INSERT INTO t1 SELECT * FROM x1;

  CREATE TABLE x2(a CHECK( a||b ), b);
  CREATE TABLE t2(a, b, CHECK( a||b ));
  INSERT INTO x2 VALUES(1, 'xx');
  INSERT INTO x2 VALUES(1, 'yy');
  INSERT INTO t2 SELECT * FROM x2;
}

do_createtable_tests 4.11 -error {constraint failed} {
  1a    "INSERT INTO x1 VALUES('one', 0)"       {}
  1b    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('one', -4.0)"    {}

  2a    "INSERT INTO x2 VALUES('abc', 1)"       {}
  2b    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('abc', 1)"       {}

  3a    "INSERT INTO x2 VALUES(0, 'abc')"       {}
  3b    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(0, 'abc')"       {}

  4a    "UPDATE t1 SET b=-1 WHERE rowid=1"      {}
  4b    "UPDATE x1 SET b=-1 WHERE rowid=1"      {}

  4a    "UPDATE x2 SET a='' WHERE rowid=1"      {}
  4b    "UPDATE t2 SET a='' WHERE rowid=1"      {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-34109-39108 If the CHECK expression evaluates to NULL,
# or any other non-zero value, it is not a constraint violation.
#
do_createtable_tests 4.12 {
  1a    "INSERT INTO x1 VALUES('one', NULL)"    {}
  1b    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('one', NULL)"    {}

  2a    "INSERT INTO x1 VALUES('one', 2)"    {}
  2b    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('one', 2)"    {}

  3a    "INSERT INTO x2 VALUES(1, 'abc')"       {}
  3b    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(1, 'abc')"       {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-02060-64547 A NOT NULL constraint may only be attached
# to a column definition, not specified as a table constraint.
#
drop_all_tables
do_createtable_tests 4.13.1 {
  1     "CREATE TABLE t1(a NOT NULL, b)"                               {}
  2     "CREATE TABLE t2(a PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL, b)"                   {}
  3     "CREATE TABLE t3(a NOT NULL, b NOT NULL, c NOT NULL UNIQUE)"   {}
}
do_createtable_tests 4.13.2 -error {
  near "NOT": syntax error
} {
  1     "CREATE TABLE t4(a, b, NOT NULL(a))"                   {}
  2     "CREATE TABLE t4(a PRIMARY KEY, b, NOT NULL(a))"       {}
  3     "CREATE TABLE t4(a, b, c UNIQUE, NOT NULL(a, b, c))"   {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-31795-57643 a NOT NULL constraint dictates that the
# associated column may not contain a NULL value. Attempting to set the
# column value to NULL when inserting a new row or updating an existing
# one causes a constraint violation.
#
#     These tests use the tables created by 4.13.
#
do_execsql_test 4.14.0 {
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('x', 'y');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('z', NULL);

  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('x', 'y');
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('z', NULL);

  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('x', 'y', 'z');
  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES(1, 2, 3);
}
do_createtable_tests 4.14 -error {
  %s may not be NULL
} {
  1    "INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL, 'a')"         {t1.a}
  2    "INSERT INTO t2 VALUES(NULL, 'b')"         {t2.a}
  3    "INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('c', 'd', NULL)"    {t3.c}
  4    "INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('e', NULL, 'f')"    {t3.b}
  5    "INSERT INTO t3 VALUES(NULL, 'g', 'h')"    {t3.a}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-42511-39459 PRIMARY KEY, UNIQUE and NOT NULL
# constraints may be explicitly assigned a default conflict resolution
# algorithm by including a conflict-clause in their definitions.
#
#     Conflict clauses: ABORT, ROLLBACK, IGNORE, FAIL, REPLACE
#
#     Test cases 4.15.*, 4.16.* and 4.17.* focus on PRIMARY KEY, NOT NULL
#     and UNIQUE constraints, respectively.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test 4.15.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1_ab(a PRIMARY KEY ON CONFLICT ABORT, b);
  CREATE TABLE t1_ro(a PRIMARY KEY ON CONFLICT ROLLBACK, b);
  CREATE TABLE t1_ig(a PRIMARY KEY ON CONFLICT IGNORE, b);
  CREATE TABLE t1_fa(a PRIMARY KEY ON CONFLICT FAIL, b);
  CREATE TABLE t1_re(a PRIMARY KEY ON CONFLICT REPLACE, b);
  CREATE TABLE t1_xx(a PRIMARY KEY, b);

  INSERT INTO t1_ab VALUES(1, 'one');
  INSERT INTO t1_ab VALUES(2, 'two');
  INSERT INTO t1_ro SELECT * FROM t1_ab;
  INSERT INTO t1_ig SELECT * FROM t1_ab;
  INSERT INTO t1_fa SELECT * FROM t1_ab;
  INSERT INTO t1_re SELECT * FROM t1_ab;
  INSERT INTO t1_xx SELECT * FROM t1_ab;

  CREATE TABLE t2_ab(a, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT ABORT);
  CREATE TABLE t2_ro(a, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT ROLLBACK);
  CREATE TABLE t2_ig(a, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT IGNORE);
  CREATE TABLE t2_fa(a, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT FAIL);
  CREATE TABLE t2_re(a, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT REPLACE);
  CREATE TABLE t2_xx(a, b NOT NULL);

  INSERT INTO t2_ab VALUES(1, 'one');
  INSERT INTO t2_ab VALUES(2, 'two');
  INSERT INTO t2_ro SELECT * FROM t2_ab;
  INSERT INTO t2_ig SELECT * FROM t2_ab;
  INSERT INTO t2_fa SELECT * FROM t2_ab;
  INSERT INTO t2_re SELECT * FROM t2_ab;
  INSERT INTO t2_xx SELECT * FROM t2_ab;

  CREATE TABLE t3_ab(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b) ON CONFLICT ABORT);
  CREATE TABLE t3_ro(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b) ON CONFLICT ROLLBACK);
  CREATE TABLE t3_ig(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b) ON CONFLICT IGNORE);
  CREATE TABLE t3_fa(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b) ON CONFLICT FAIL);
  CREATE TABLE t3_re(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b) ON CONFLICT REPLACE);
  CREATE TABLE t3_xx(a, b, UNIQUE(a, b));

  INSERT INTO t3_ab VALUES(1, 'one');
  INSERT INTO t3_ab VALUES(2, 'two');
  INSERT INTO t3_ro SELECT * FROM t3_ab;
  INSERT INTO t3_ig SELECT * FROM t3_ab;
  INSERT INTO t3_fa SELECT * FROM t3_ab;
  INSERT INTO t3_re SELECT * FROM t3_ab;
  INSERT INTO t3_xx SELECT * FROM t3_ab;
}

foreach {tn tbl res ac data} {
  1   t1_ab    {1 {column a is not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
  2   t1_ro    {1 {column a is not unique}} 1 {1 one 2 two}
  3   t1_fa    {1 {column a is not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 string}
  4   t1_ig    {0 {}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 string 6 string}
  5   t1_re    {0 {}} 0 {1 one 2 two 4 string 3 string 6 string}
  6   t1_xx    {1 {column a is not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
} {
  catchsql COMMIT
  do_execsql_test  4.15.$tn.1 "BEGIN; INSERT INTO $tbl VALUES(3, 'three')"

  do_catchsql_test 4.15.$tn.2 " 
    INSERT INTO $tbl SELECT ((a%2)*a+3), 'string' FROM $tbl;
  " $res

  do_test e_createtable-4.15.$tn.3 { sqlite3_get_autocommit db } $ac
  do_execsql_test 4.15.$tn.4 "SELECT * FROM $tbl" $data
}
foreach {tn tbl res ac data} {
  1   t2_ab    {1 {t2_ab.b may not be NULL}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
  2   t2_ro    {1 {t2_ro.b may not be NULL}} 1 {1 one 2 two}
  3   t2_fa    {1 {t2_fa.b may not be NULL}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 xx}
  4   t2_ig    {0 {}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 xx 6 xx}
  5   t2_re    {1 {t2_re.b may not be NULL}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
  6   t2_xx    {1 {t2_xx.b may not be NULL}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
} {
  catchsql COMMIT
  do_execsql_test  4.16.$tn.1 "BEGIN; INSERT INTO $tbl VALUES(3, 'three')"

  do_catchsql_test 4.16.$tn.2 " 
    INSERT INTO $tbl SELECT a+3, CASE a WHEN 2 THEN NULL ELSE 'xx' END FROM $tbl
  " $res

  do_test e_createtable-4.16.$tn.3 { sqlite3_get_autocommit db } $ac
  do_execsql_test 4.16.$tn.4 "SELECT * FROM $tbl" $data
}
foreach {tn tbl res ac data} {
  1   t3_ab    {1 {columns a, b are not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
  2   t3_ro    {1 {columns a, b are not unique}} 1 {1 one 2 two}
  3   t3_fa    {1 {columns a, b are not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 three}
  4   t3_ig    {0 {}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three 4 three 6 three}
  5   t3_re    {0 {}} 0 {1 one 2 two 4 three 3 three 6 three}
  6   t3_xx    {1 {columns a, b are not unique}} 0 {1 one 2 two 3 three}
} {
  catchsql COMMIT
  do_execsql_test  4.17.$tn.1 "BEGIN; INSERT INTO $tbl VALUES(3, 'three')"

  do_catchsql_test 4.17.$tn.2 " 
    INSERT INTO $tbl SELECT ((a%2)*a+3), 'three' FROM $tbl
  " $res

  do_test e_createtable-4.17.$tn.3 { sqlite3_get_autocommit db } $ac
  do_execsql_test 4.17.$tn.4 "SELECT * FROM $tbl" $data
}
catchsql COMMIT

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-12645-39772 Or, if a constraint definition does not
# include a conflict-clause or it is a CHECK constraint, the default
# conflict resolution algorithm is ABORT.
#
#     The first half of the above is tested along with explicit ON 
#     CONFLICT clauses above (specifically, the tests involving t1_xx, t2_xx
#     and t3_xx). The following just tests that the default conflict
#     handling for CHECK constraints is ABORT.
#
do_execsql_test 4.18.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t4(a, b CHECK (b!=10));
  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES(1, 2);
  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES(3, 4);
}
do_execsql_test  4.18.2 { BEGIN; INSERT INTO t4 VALUES(5, 6) }
do_catchsql_test 4.18.3 { 
  INSERT INTO t4 SELECT a+4, b+4 FROM t4
} {1 {constraint failed}}
do_test e_createtable-4.18.4 { sqlite3_get_autocommit db } 0
do_execsql_test 4.18.5 { SELECT * FROM t4 } {1 2 3 4 5 6}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-19114-56113 Different constraints within the same table
# may have different default conflict resolution algorithms.
#
do_execsql_test 4.19.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t5(a NOT NULL ON CONFLICT IGNORE, b NOT NULL ON CONFLICT ABORT);
}
do_catchsql_test 4.19.1 { INSERT INTO t5 VALUES(NULL, 'not null') } {0 {}}
do_execsql_test  4.19.2 { SELECT * FROM t5 } {}
do_catchsql_test 4.19.3 { INSERT INTO t5 VALUES('not null', NULL) } \
  {1 {t5.b may not be NULL}}
do_execsql_test  4.19.4 { SELECT * FROM t5 } {}

#------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Tests for INTEGER PRIMARY KEY and rowid related statements.
#

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-52584-04009 The rowid value can be accessed using one
# of the special case-independent names "rowid", "oid", or "_rowid_" in
# place of a column name.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test 5.1.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t1(x, y);
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('one', 'first');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('two', 'second');
  INSERT INTO t1 VALUES('three', 'third');
}
do_createtable_tests 5.1 {
  1   "SELECT rowid FROM t1"        {1 2 3}
  2   "SELECT oid FROM t1"          {1 2 3}
  3   "SELECT _rowid_ FROM t1"      {1 2 3}
  4   "SELECT ROWID FROM t1"        {1 2 3}
  5   "SELECT OID FROM t1"          {1 2 3}
  6   "SELECT _ROWID_ FROM t1"      {1 2 3}
  7   "SELECT RoWiD FROM t1"        {1 2 3}
  8   "SELECT OiD FROM t1"          {1 2 3}
  9   "SELECT _RoWiD_ FROM t1"      {1 2 3}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-26501-17306 If a table contains a user defined column
# named "rowid", "oid" or "_rowid_", then that name always refers the
# explicitly declared column and cannot be used to retrieve the integer
# rowid value.
#
do_execsql_test 5.2.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t2(oid, b);
  CREATE TABLE t3(a, _rowid_);
  CREATE TABLE t4(a, b, rowid);

  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('one', 'two');
  INSERT INTO t2 VALUES('three', 'four');

  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('five', 'six');
  INSERT INTO t3 VALUES('seven', 'eight');

  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('nine', 'ten', 'eleven');
  INSERT INTO t4 VALUES('twelve', 'thirteen', 'fourteen');
}
do_createtable_tests 5.2 {
  1   "SELECT oid, rowid, _rowid_ FROM t2"   {one 1 1      three 2 2}
  2   "SELECT oid, rowid, _rowid_ FROM t3"   {1 1 six      2 2 eight} 
  3   "SELECT oid, rowid, _rowid_ FROM t4"   {1 eleven 1   2 fourteen 2}
}


# Argument $tbl is the name of a table in the database. Argument $col is
# the name of one of the tables columns. Return 1 if $col is an alias for
# the rowid, or 0 otherwise.
#
proc is_integer_primary_key {tbl col} {
  lindex [db eval [subst {
    DELETE FROM $tbl;
    INSERT INTO $tbl ($col) VALUES(0);
    SELECT (rowid==$col) FROM $tbl;
    DELETE FROM $tbl;
  }]] 0
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-53738-31673 With one exception, if a table has a
# primary key that consists of a single column, and the declared type of
# that column is "INTEGER" in any mixture of upper and lower case, then
# the column becomes an alias for the rowid.
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-45951-08347 if the declaration of a column with
# declared type "INTEGER" includes an "PRIMARY KEY DESC" clause, it does
# not become an alias for the rowid and is not classified as an integer
# primary key.
#
do_createtable_tests 5.3 -tclquery { 
  is_integer_primary_key t5 pk
} -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE t5 }
} {
  1   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk integer primary key)"                         1
  2   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk integer, primary key(pk))"                    1
  3   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk integer, v integer, primary key(pk))"         1
  4   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk integer, v integer, primary key(pk, v))"      0
  5   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk int, v integer, primary key(pk, v))"          0
  6   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk int, v integer, primary key(pk))"             0
  7   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk int primary key, v integer)"                  0
  8   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk inTEger primary key)"                         1
  9   "CREATE TABLE t5(pk inteGEr, primary key(pk))"                    1
  10  "CREATE TABLE t5(pk INTEGER, v integer, primary key(pk))"         1
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-41444-49665 Other integer type names like "INT" or
# "BIGINT" or "SHORT INTEGER" or "UNSIGNED INTEGER" causes the primary
# key column to behave as an ordinary table column with integer affinity
# and a unique index, not as an alias for the rowid.
#
do_execsql_test 5.4.1 {
  CREATE TABLE t6(pk INT primary key);
  CREATE TABLE t7(pk BIGINT primary key);
  CREATE TABLE t8(pk SHORT INTEGER primary key);
  CREATE TABLE t9(pk UNSIGNED INTEGER primary key);
} 
do_test e_createtable-5.4.2.1 { is_integer_primary_key t6 pk } 0
do_test e_createtable-5.4.2.2 { is_integer_primary_key t7 pk } 0
do_test e_createtable-5.4.2.3 { is_integer_primary_key t8 pk } 0
do_test e_createtable-5.4.2.4 { is_integer_primary_key t9 pk } 0

do_execsql_test 5.4.3 {
  INSERT INTO t6 VALUES('2.0');
  INSERT INTO t7 VALUES('2.0');
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES('2.0');
  INSERT INTO t9 VALUES('2.0');
  SELECT typeof(pk), pk FROM t6;
  SELECT typeof(pk), pk FROM t7;
  SELECT typeof(pk), pk FROM t8;
  SELECT typeof(pk), pk FROM t9;
} {integer 2 integer 2 integer 2 integer 2}

do_catchsql_test 5.4.4.1 { 
  INSERT INTO t6 VALUES(2) 
} {1 {column pk is not unique}}
do_catchsql_test 5.4.4.2 { 
  INSERT INTO t7 VALUES(2) 
} {1 {column pk is not unique}}
do_catchsql_test 5.4.4.3 { 
  INSERT INTO t8 VALUES(2) 
} {1 {column pk is not unique}}
do_catchsql_test 5.4.4.4 { 
  INSERT INTO t9 VALUES(2) 
} {1 {column pk is not unique}}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-56094-57830 the following three table declarations all
# cause the column "x" to be an alias for the rowid (an integer primary
# key): CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY ASC, y, z); CREATE TABLE
# t(x INTEGER, y, z, PRIMARY KEY(x ASC)); CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER, y,
# z, PRIMARY KEY(x DESC));
#
# EVIDENCE-OF: R-20149-25884 the following declaration does not result
# in "x" being an alias for the rowid: CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER PRIMARY
# KEY DESC, y, z);
#
do_createtable_tests 5 -tclquery { 
  is_integer_primary_key t x
} -repair {
  catchsql { DROP TABLE t }
} {
  5.1    "CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY ASC, y, z)"      1
  5.2    "CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER, y, z, PRIMARY KEY(x ASC))"  1
  5.3    "CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER, y, z, PRIMARY KEY(x DESC))" 1
  6.1    "CREATE TABLE t(x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY DESC, y, z)"     0
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-03733-29734 Rowid values may be modified using an
# UPDATE statement in the same way as any other column value can, either
# using one of the built-in aliases ("rowid", "oid" or "_rowid_") or by
# using an alias created by an integer primary key.
#
do_execsql_test 5.7.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t10(a, b);
  INSERT INTO t10 VALUES('ten', 10);

  CREATE TABLE t11(a, b INTEGER PRIMARY KEY);
  INSERT INTO t11 VALUES('ten', 10);
}
do_createtable_tests 5.7.1 -query { 
  SELECT rowid, _rowid_, oid FROM t10;
} {
  1    "UPDATE t10 SET rowid = 5"   {5 5 5}
  2    "UPDATE t10 SET _rowid_ = 6" {6 6 6}
  3    "UPDATE t10 SET oid = 7"     {7 7 7}
}
do_createtable_tests 5.7.2 -query { 
  SELECT rowid, _rowid_, oid, b FROM t11;
} {
  1    "UPDATE t11 SET rowid = 5"   {5 5 5 5}
  2    "UPDATE t11 SET _rowid_ = 6" {6 6 6 6}
  3    "UPDATE t11 SET oid = 7"     {7 7 7 7}
  4    "UPDATE t11 SET b = 8"       {8 8 8 8}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-58706-14229 Similarly, an INSERT statement may provide
# a value to use as the rowid for each row inserted.
#
do_createtable_tests 5.8.1 -query { 
  SELECT rowid, _rowid_, oid FROM t10;
} -repair { 
  execsql { DELETE FROM t10 } 
} {
  1    "INSERT INTO t10(oid) VALUES(15)"           {15 15 15}
  2    "INSERT INTO t10(rowid) VALUES(16)"         {16 16 16}
  3    "INSERT INTO t10(_rowid_) VALUES(17)"       {17 17 17}
  4    "INSERT INTO t10(a, b, oid) VALUES(1,2,3)"  {3 3 3}
}
do_createtable_tests 5.8.2 -query { 
  SELECT rowid, _rowid_, oid, b FROM t11;
} -repair { 
  execsql { DELETE FROM t11 } 
} {
  1    "INSERT INTO t11(oid) VALUES(15)"           {15 15 15 15}
  2    "INSERT INTO t11(rowid) VALUES(16)"         {16 16 16 16}
  3    "INSERT INTO t11(_rowid_) VALUES(17)"       {17 17 17 17}
  4    "INSERT INTO t11(a, b) VALUES(1,2)"         {2 2 2 2}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-32326-44592 Unlike normal SQLite columns, an integer
# primary key or rowid column must contain integer values. Integer
# primary key or rowid columns are not able to hold floating point
# values, strings, BLOBs, or NULLs.
#
#     This is considered by the tests for the following 3 statements,
#     which show that:
#
#       1. Attempts to UPDATE a rowid column to a non-integer value fail,
#       2. Attempts to INSERT a real, string or blob value into a rowid 
#          column fail, and
#       3. Attempting to INSERT a NULL value into a rowid column causes the
#          system to automatically select an integer value to use.
#


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-64224-62578 If an UPDATE statement attempts to set an
# integer primary key or rowid column to a NULL or blob value, or to a
# string or real value that cannot be losslessly converted to an
# integer, a "datatype mismatch" error occurs and the statement is
# aborted.
#
drop_all_tables
do_execsql_test 5.9.0 {
  CREATE TABLE t12(x INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, y);
  INSERT INTO t12 VALUES(5, 'five');
}
do_createtable_tests 5.9.1 -query { SELECT typeof(x), x FROM t12 } {
  1   "UPDATE t12 SET x = 4"       {integer 4}
  2   "UPDATE t12 SET x = 10.0"    {integer 10}
  3   "UPDATE t12 SET x = '12.0'"  {integer 12}
  4   "UPDATE t12 SET x = '-15.0'" {integer -15}
}
do_createtable_tests 5.9.2 -error {
  datatype mismatch
} {
  1   "UPDATE t12 SET x = 4.1"         {}
  2   "UPDATE t12 SET x = 'hello'"     {}
  3   "UPDATE t12 SET x = NULL"        {}
  4   "UPDATE t12 SET x = X'ABCD'"     {}
  5   "UPDATE t12 SET x = X'3900'"     {}
  6   "UPDATE t12 SET x = X'39'"       {}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-05734-13629 If an INSERT statement attempts to insert a
# blob value, or a string or real value that cannot be losslessly
# converted to an integer into an integer primary key or rowid column, a
# "datatype mismatch" error occurs and the statement is aborted.
#
do_execsql_test 5.10.0 { DELETE FROM t12 }
do_createtable_tests 5.10.1 -error { 
  datatype mismatch
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(4.1)"     {}
  2   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES('hello')" {}
  3   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(X'ABCD')" {}
  4   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(X'3900')" {}
  5   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(X'39')"   {}
}
do_createtable_tests 5.10.2 -query { 
  SELECT typeof(x), x FROM t12 
} -repair {
  execsql { DELETE FROM t12 }
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(4)"       {integer 4}
  2   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES(10.0)"    {integer 10}
  3   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES('12.0')"  {integer 12}
  4   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES('4e3')"   {integer 4000}
  5   "INSERT INTO t12(x) VALUES('-14.0')" {integer -14}
}

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-07986-46024 If an INSERT statement attempts to insert a
# NULL value into a rowid or integer primary key column, the system
# chooses an integer value to use as the rowid automatically.
#
do_execsql_test 5.11.0 { DELETE FROM t12 }
do_createtable_tests 5.11 -query { 
  SELECT typeof(x), x FROM t12 WHERE y IS (SELECT max(y) FROM t12)
} {
  1   "INSERT INTO t12 DEFAULT VALUES"                {integer 1}
  2   "INSERT INTO t12(y)   VALUES(5)"                {integer 2}
  3   "INSERT INTO t12(x,y) VALUES(NULL, 10)"         {integer 3}
  4   "INSERT INTO t12(x,y) SELECT NULL, 15 FROM t12" 
      {integer 4 integer 5 integer 6}
  5   "INSERT INTO t12(y) SELECT 20 FROM t12 LIMIT 3"
      {integer 7 integer 8 integer 9}
}

finish_test