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sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100.zip won't work roperly
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sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100.zip won't work roperly

(1) By Lidor (PrototypeX) on 2020-04-16 07:54:40 [link]

Hello,
I downloaded https://www.sqlite.org/2020/sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100.zip the sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100.zip option, on windows 10 and when I use the sqlite3 of it, and I'm trying to open the general empty file I created or the db file that I created, it just ignores it and create a new file where this program is installed with a name of the main folder, and even if I try to use that file that he created it would ignore it and create another one.

any thought on why it does it or how can I fix it?

(2) By Gunter Hick (gunter_hick) on 2020-04-16 10:43:42 in reply to 1 [link]

From what I have gathered, this is Windows getting in the way and not allowing access to files outside the application's sandbox (IIRC the folder the application is installed in).

Maybe someone in the forum has experience in configuring Windows and will chime in, but a Windows support forum is probably a better bet.

(3) By Larry Brasfield (LarryBrasfield) on 2020-04-16 10:45:39 in reply to 1 [link]

You will have to show what you a actually doing that leads to disappointment, and what the actual results were, rather than summarizing it.  That would be information such as what you typed to invoke sqlite3.exe, what you typed when it was running, what the responses were, and if not obvious, what you expected.

FYI, the very tools within the .zip I downloaded using the above URL work just fine on Windows 10.  So your problem is something odd that you are doing. Show us, and somebody will explain.

(4) By Larry Brasfield (LarryBrasfield) on 2020-04-16 10:50:05 in reply to 2 [link]

To Gunter's point: You (the OP) should also show how you extracted from the .zip archive and where the .exe files ended up.  It's not hard, but you do have to get them either into a directory named in the PATH environment variable or into the directory from which you invoked sqlite3.exe .

If you are clicking on things rather than typing into a CMD shell (or equivalent), you should spell that out too.

(5) By Lidor (PrototypeX) on 2020-04-16 11:56:22 in reply to 1 [link]

Edit (for and based on the replies I got) :

I installed the package on my D drive (I also tried converting it into my C drive, same results) in my college folder, in that address: D:\\Users\\Lidor\\College\\Databases\\SQLite\\sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100.zip I did the "Unzip here" option and got that folder (D:\\Users\\Lidor\\College\\Databases\\SQLite\\sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100), inside of it there 3 items:

 1) sqldiff
 2) sqlite3
 3) sqlite3_analyzer

I created an empty file name MyDB and a db file name MyDB2, and then I double click the second option (the sqlite3), in it I write this command:

  sqlite> .open D:\\Users\\Lidor\\College\\Databases\\SQLite\\sqlite-tools-win32-x86-3310100\\MyDB2

and then it goes to next line, shows no errors, and when I check the folder, it ignored my files and created a general file name UsersLidor in the same folder. (I tried with MyDB and with MyDB2, same result). and ofc when I type the sqlite> .database, it shows the file that he created, but if I ever try to use it or change it's name it will again create the same file with the name UsersLidor.

regarding some of the answers I got, what does it mean to install it on the PATH?

(6) By Lidor (PrototypeX) on 2020-04-16 11:57:10 in reply to 1 [link]

Deleted

(7) By Gunter Hick (gunter_hick) on 2020-04-16 13:25:04 in reply to 1

See https://sqlite.org/cli.html

Windows users can double-click on the sqlite3.exe icon to cause the command-line shell to pop-up a terminal window running SQLite. However, because double-clicking starts the sqlite3.exe without command-line arguments, no database file will have been specified, so SQLite will use a temporary database that is deleted when the session exits. To use a persistent disk file as the database, enter the ".open" command immediately after the terminal window starts up: 

SQLite version 3.28.0 2019-03-02 15:25:24
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
Connected to a transient in-memory database.
Use ".open FILENAME" to reopen on a persistent database.
sqlite> .open ex1.db
sqlite>

The example above causes the database file named "ex1.db" to be opened and used. The "ex1.db" file is created if it does not previously exist. You might want to use a full pathname to ensure that the file is in the directory that you think it is in. Use forward-slashes as the directory separator character. In other words use "c:/work/ex1.db", not "c:\work\ex1.db".

(8) By Larry Brasfield (LarryBrasfield) on 2020-04-16 16:00:27 in reply to 7 [link]

That's fine advice from Gunter.

However, sqlite3.exe (shell) is perfectly willing to open files with backslash used for path component separators.  The only complication is that you have to double them because the shell does C-style escaping for dot commands.  So you can load a DB thusly:

```
> sqlite3 "My Spacy Directory\silly.sdb"
SQLite version 3.31.1 2020-01-27 19:55:54
Enter ".help" for usage hints.

OR

> sqlite3
SQLite version 3.31.1 2020-01-27 19:55:54
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
Connected to a transient in-memory database.
Use ".open FILENAME" to reopen on a persistent database.
.open "My Spacy Directory\\silly.sdb"
sqlite> 
```

On second thought, using forward slash is easier to type:

```
> sqlite3
SQLite version 3.31.1 2020-01-27 19:55:54
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
Connected to a transient in-memory database.
Use ".open FILENAME" to reopen on a persistent database.
sqlite> .open "My Spacy Directory/silly.sdb"
sqlite>

OR

sqlite> .open NonspacedDirectory/whatever.db
sqlite>
```