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SQLite training in Houston TX on 2019-11-05 (details)
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Overview
Comment:Typos and spelling errors in documention. (CVS 2014)
Downloads: Tarball | ZIP archive | SQL archive
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1: 16e2ace2db5c051aefe7f72504ad6c1cc5e7a0f4
User & Date: drh 2004-10-10 17:24:54
Context
2004-10-10
18:00
Documentation updates (CVS 2015) check-in: a4546c09 user: drh tags: trunk
17:24
Typos and spelling errors in documention. (CVS 2014) check-in: 16e2ace2 user: drh tags: trunk
2004-10-09
15:54
New links on the common header page of the website. (CVS 2013) check-in: 6d6246f1 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to www/arch.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the sqlite.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: arch.tcl,v 1.15 2004/09/08 13:06:21 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: arch.tcl,v 1.16 2004/10/10 17:24:54 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {Architecture of SQLite}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>The Architecture Of SQLite</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <h3>Introduction</h3>
    11     11   
................................................................................
   161    161   </p>
   162    162   
   163    163   <h3>Page Cache</h3>
   164    164   
   165    165   <p>The B-tree module requests information from the disk in fixed-size
   166    166   chunks.  The default chunk size is 1024 bytes but can vary between 512
   167    167   and 65536 bytes.
   168         -The page cache is reponsible for reading, writing, and
          168  +The page cache is responsible for reading, writing, and
   169    169   caching these chunks.
   170    170   The page cache also provides the rollback and atomic commit abstraction
   171    171   and takes care of locking of the database file.  The
   172    172   B-tree driver requests particular pages from the page cache and notifies
   173    173   the page cache when it wants to modify pages or commit or rollback
   174    174   changes and the page cache handles all the messy details of making sure
   175    175   the requests are handled quickly, safely, and efficiently.</p>

Changes to www/capi3ref.tcl.

     1         -set rcsid {$Id: capi3ref.tcl,v 1.13 2004/09/30 13:43:14 drh Exp $}
            1  +set rcsid {$Id: capi3ref.tcl,v 1.14 2004/10/10 17:24:54 drh Exp $}
     2      2   source common.tcl
     3      3   header {C/C++ Interface For SQLite Version 3}
     4      4   puts {
     5      5   <h2>C/C++ Interface For SQLite Version 3</h2>
     6      6   }
     7      7   
     8      8   proc api {name prototype desc {notused x}} {
................................................................................
    31     31   #define SQLITE_NOTFOUND    12   /* (Internal Only) Table or record not found */
    32     32   #define SQLITE_FULL        13   /* Insertion failed because database is full */
    33     33   #define SQLITE_CANTOPEN    14   /* Unable to open the database file */
    34     34   #define SQLITE_PROTOCOL    15   /* Database lock protocol error */
    35     35   #define SQLITE_EMPTY       16   /* (Internal Only) Database table is empty */
    36     36   #define SQLITE_SCHEMA      17   /* The database schema changed */
    37     37   #define SQLITE_TOOBIG      18   /* Too much data for one row of a table */
    38         -#define SQLITE_CONSTRAINT  19   /* Abort due to contraint violation */
           38  +#define SQLITE_CONSTRAINT  19   /* Abort due to constraint violation */
    39     39   #define SQLITE_MISMATCH    20   /* Data type mismatch */
    40     40   #define SQLITE_MISUSE      21   /* Library used incorrectly */
    41     41   #define SQLITE_NOLFS       22   /* Uses OS features not supported on host */
    42     42   #define SQLITE_AUTH        23   /* Authorization denied */
    43     43   #define SQLITE_ROW         100  /* sqlite_step() has another row ready */
    44     44   #define SQLITE_DONE        101  /* sqlite_step() has finished executing */
    45     45   } {
................................................................................
   166    166   }
   167    167   
   168    168   api {} {
   169    169     int sqlite3_busy_timeout(sqlite3*, int ms);
   170    170   } {
   171    171    This routine sets a busy handler that sleeps for a while when a
   172    172    table is locked.  The handler will sleep multiple times until 
   173         - at least "ms" milleseconds of sleeping have been done.  After
   174         - "ms" milleseconds of sleeping, the handler returns 0 which
          173  + at least "ms" milliseconds of sleeping have been done.  After
          174  + "ms" milliseconds of sleeping, the handler returns 0 which
   175    175    causes sqlite3_exec() to return SQLITE_BUSY.
   176    176   
   177    177    Calling this routine with an argument less than or equal to zero
   178    178    turns off all busy handlers.
   179    179   }
   180    180   
   181    181   api {} {
................................................................................
   494    494   #define SQLITE_UTF8     1
   495    495   #define SQLITE_UTF16    2
   496    496   #define SQLITE_UTF16BE  3
   497    497   #define SQLITE_UTF16LE  4
   498    498   #define SQLITE_ANY      5
   499    499   } {
   500    500    These two functions are used to add user functions or aggregates
   501         - implemented in C to the SQL langauge interpreted by SQLite. The
          501  + implemented in C to the SQL language interpreted by SQLite. The
   502    502    difference only between the two is that the second parameter, the
   503    503    name of the (scalar) function or aggregate, is encoded in UTF-8 for
   504    504    sqlite3_create_function() and UTF-16 for sqlite3_create_function16().
   505    505   
   506    506    The first argument is the database handle that the new function or
   507    507    aggregate is to be added to. If a single program uses more than one
   508    508    database handle internally, then user functions or aggregates must 
................................................................................
   516    516    The sixth, seventh and  eighth, xFunc, xStep and xFinal, are
   517    517    pointers to user implemented C functions that implement the user
   518    518    function or aggregate. A scalar function requires an implementation of
   519    519    the xFunc callback only, NULL pointers should be passed as the xStep
   520    520    and xFinal parameters. An aggregate function requires an implementation
   521    521    of xStep and xFinal, but NULL should be passed for xFunc. To delete an
   522    522    existing user function or aggregate, pass NULL for all three function
   523         - callback. Specifying an inconstent set of callback values, such as an
          523  + callback. Specifying an inconstant set of callback values, such as an
   524    524    xFunc and an xFinal, or an xStep but no xFinal, SQLITE_ERROR is
   525    525    returned.
   526    526   }
   527    527   
   528    528   api {} {
   529    529   int sqlite3_data_count(sqlite3_stmt *pStmt);
   530    530   } {
................................................................................
   631    631    All prepared statements must finalized before sqlite3_close() is
   632    632    called or else the close will fail with a return code of SQLITE_BUSY.
   633    633   
   634    634    This routine can be called at any point during the execution of the
   635    635    virtual machine.  If the virtual machine has not completed execution
   636    636    when this routine is called, that is like encountering an error or
   637    637    an interrupt.  (See sqlite3_interrupt().)  Incomplete updates may be
   638         - rolled back and transactions cancelled,  depending on the circumstances,
          638  + rolled back and transactions canceled,  depending on the circumstances,
   639    639    and the result code returned will be SQLITE_ABORT.
   640    640   }
   641    641   
   642    642   api {} {
   643    643   void sqlite3_free(char *z);
   644    644   } {
   645    645    Use this routine to free memory obtained from 
................................................................................
   726    726   
   727    727   api {} {
   728    728   char *sqlite3_mprintf(const char*,...);
   729    729   char *sqlite3_vmprintf(const char*, va_list);
   730    730   } {
   731    731    These routines are variants of the "sprintf()" from the
   732    732    standard C library.  The resulting string is written into memory
   733         - obtained from malloc() so that there is never a possiblity of buffer
          733  + obtained from malloc() so that there is never a possibility of buffer
   734    734    overflow.  These routines also implement some additional formatting
   735    735    options that are useful for constructing SQL statements.
   736    736   
   737    737    The strings returned by these routines should be freed by calling
   738    738    sqlite3_free().
   739    739   
   740    740    All of the usual printf formatting options apply.  In addition, there
................................................................................
   998    998    violation) has occurred.  sqlite3_step() should not be called again on
   999    999    the VM. More information may be found by calling sqlite3_errmsg().
  1000   1000   
  1001   1001    SQLITE_MISUSE means that the this routine was called inappropriately.
  1002   1002    Perhaps it was called on a virtual machine that had already been
  1003   1003    finalized or on one that had previously returned SQLITE_ERROR or
  1004   1004    SQLITE_DONE.  Or it could be the case the the same database connection
  1005         - is being used simulataneously by two or more threads.
         1005  + is being used simultaneously by two or more threads.
  1006   1006   }
  1007   1007   
  1008   1008   api {} {
  1009   1009   void *sqlite3_trace(sqlite3*, void(*xTrace)(void*,const char*), void*);
  1010   1010   } {
  1011   1011    Register a function that is called each time an SQL statement is evaluated.
  1012   1012    The callback function is invoked on the first call to sqlite3_step() after

Changes to www/changes.tcl.

   314    314   
   315    315   chng {2002 Sep 25 (2.7.2)} {
   316    316   <li>Prevent journal file overflows on huge transactions.</li>
   317    317   <li>Fix a memory leak that occurred when sqlite_open() failed.</li>
   318    318   <li>Honor the ORDER BY and LIMIT clause of a SELECT even if the
   319    319       result set is used for an INSERT.</li>
   320    320   <li>Do not put write locks on the file used to hold TEMP tables.</li>
   321         -<li>Added documention on SELECT DISTINCT and on how SQLite handles NULLs.</li>
          321  +<li>Added documentation on SELECT DISTINCT and on how SQLite handles NULLs.</li>
   322    322   <li>Fix a problem that was causing poor performance when many thousands
   323    323       of SQL statements were executed by a single sqlite_exec() call.</li>
   324    324   }
   325    325   
   326    326   chng {2002 Aug 31 (2.7.1)} {
   327    327   <li>Fix a bug in the ORDER BY logic that was introduced in version 2.7.0</li>
   328    328   <li>C-style comments are now accepted by the tokenizer.</li>
................................................................................
   329    329   <li>INSERT runs a little faster when the source is a SELECT statement.</li>
   330    330   }
   331    331   
   332    332   chng {2002 Aug 25 (2.7.0)} {
   333    333   <li>Make a distinction between numeric and text values when sorting.
   334    334       Text values sort according to memcmp().  Numeric values sort in
   335    335       numeric order.</li>
   336         -<li>Allow multiple simulataneous readers under windows by simulating
          336  +<li>Allow multiple simultaneous readers under windows by simulating
   337    337       the reader/writers locks that are missing from Win95/98/ME.</li>
   338    338   <li>An error is now returned when trying to start a transaction if
   339    339       another transaction is already active.</li>
   340    340   }
   341    341   
   342    342   chng {2002 Aug 12 (2.6.3)} {
   343    343   <li>Add the ability to read both little-endian and big-endian databases.
................................................................................
   429    429   
   430    430   chng {2002 Jun 17 (2.5.0)} {
   431    431   <li>Added support for row triggers.</li>
   432    432   <li>Added SQL-92 compliant handling of NULLs.</li>
   433    433   <li>Add support for the full SQL-92 join syntax and LEFT OUTER JOINs.</li>
   434    434   <li>Double-quoted strings interpreted as column names not text literals.</li>
   435    435   <li>Parse (but do not implement) foreign keys.</li>
   436         -<li>Performance improvemenets in the parser, pager, and WHERE clause code
          436  +<li>Performance improvements in the parser, pager, and WHERE clause code
   437    437       generator.</li>
   438    438   <li>Make the LIMIT clause work on subqueries.  (ORDER BY still does not
   439    439       work, though.)</li>
   440    440   <li>Added the "%Q" expansion to sqlite_*_printf().</li>
   441         -<li>Bug fixes too numerious to mention (see the change log).</li>
          441  +<li>Bug fixes too numerous to mention (see the change log).</li>
   442    442   }
   443    443   
   444    444   chng {2002 May 09 (2.4.12)} {
   445    445   <li>Added logic to detect when the library API routines are called out
   446    446       of sequence.</li>
   447    447   }
   448    448   
................................................................................
   479    479   }
   480    480   
   481    481   chng {2002 Apr 06 (2.4.7)} {
   482    482   <li>Add the ability to put TABLE.* in the column list of a
   483    483       SELECT statement.</li>
   484    484   <li>Permit SELECT statements without a FROM clause.</li>
   485    485   <li>Added the <b>last_insert_rowid()</b> SQL function.</li>
   486         -<li>Do not count rows where the IGNORE conflict resultion occurs in
          486  +<li>Do not count rows where the IGNORE conflict resolution occurs in
   487    487       the row count.</li>
   488    488   <li>Make sure functions expressions in the VALUES clause of an INSERT
   489    489       are correct.</li>
   490    490   <li>Added the <b>sqlite_changes()</b> API function to return the number
   491    491       of row that changed in the most recent operation.</li>
   492    492   }
   493    493   
................................................................................
   551    551       are 4 times smaller.</li>
   552    552   <li>Added support for user-defined functions implemented in C.</li>
   553    553   <li>Added support for new functions: <b>coalesce()</b>, <b>lower()</b>,
   554    554       <b>upper()</b>, and <b>random()</b>
   555    555   <li>Added support for VIEWs.</li>
   556    556   <li>Added the subquery flattening optimizer.</li>
   557    557   <li>Modified the B-Tree and Pager modules so that disk pages that do not
   558         -    contain real data (free pages) are not journalled and are not
          558  +    contain real data (free pages) are not journaled and are not
   559    559       written from memory back to the disk when they change.  This does not 
   560    560       impact database integrity, since the
   561    561       pages contain no real data, but it does make large INSERT operations
   562    562       about 2.5 times faster and large DELETEs about 5 times faster.</li>
   563    563   <li>Made the CACHE_SIZE pragma persistent</li>
   564    564   <li>Added the SYNCHRONOUS pragma</li>
   565    565   <li>Fixed a bug that was causing updates to fail inside of transactions when
................................................................................
   713    713   <li>Change the code so that version 2.1.1 databases that were rendered 
   714    714       unreadable by the above bug can be read by this version of
   715    715       the library even though the SQLITE_MASTER table is (slightly)
   716    716       corrupted.</li>
   717    717   }
   718    718   
   719    719   chng {2001 Nov 13 (2.1.1)} {
   720         -<li>Bug fix: Sometimes arbirary strings were passed to the callback
          720  +<li>Bug fix: Sometimes arbitrary strings were passed to the callback
   721    721       function when the actual value of a column was NULL.</li>
   722    722   }
   723    723   
   724    724   chng {2001 Nov 12 (2.1.0)} {
   725    725   <li>Change the format of data records so that records up to 16MB in size
   726    726       can be stored.</li>
   727    727   <li>Change the format of indices to allow for better query optimization.</li>
................................................................................
   761    761   <li>Added the COUNT_CHANGES pragma.</li>
   762    762   <li>Changes to the FULL_COLUMN_NAMES pragma to help out the ODBC driver.</li>
   763    763   <li>Bug fix: "SELECT count(*)" was returning NULL for empty tables.
   764    764       Now it returns 0.</li>
   765    765   }
   766    766   
   767    767   chng {2001 Oct 13 (2.0.4)} {
   768         -<li>Bug fix: an abscure and relatively harmless bug was causing one of
          768  +<li>Bug fix: an obscure and relatively harmless bug was causing one of
   769    769       the tests to fail when gcc optimizations are turned on.  This release
   770    770       fixes the problem.</li>
   771    771   }
   772    772   
   773    773   chng {2001 Oct 13 (2.0.3)} {
   774    774   <li>Bug fix: the <b>sqlite_busy_timeout()</b> function was delaying 1000
   775    775       times too long before failing.</li>

Changes to www/conflict.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the constraint.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: conflict.tcl,v 1.3 2004/05/31 15:06:30 drh Exp $ }
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: conflict.tcl,v 1.4 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $ }
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {Constraint Conflict Resolution in SQLite}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h1>Constraint Conflict Resolution in SQLite</h1>
     9      9   
    10     10   <p>
    11     11   In most SQL databases, if you have a UNIQUE constraint on
................................................................................
    71     71   many other SQL databases as possible, but different SQL database
    72     72   engines exhibit different conflict resolution strategies.  For
    73     73   example, PostgreSQL always uses ROLLBACK, Oracle always uses ABORT, and
    74     74   MySQL usually uses FAIL but can be instructed to use IGNORE or REPLACE.
    75     75   By supporting all five alternatives, SQLite provides maximum
    76     76   portability.</p>
    77     77   
    78         -<p>Another reason for supporing multiple algorithms is that sometimes
           78  +<p>Another reason for supporting multiple algorithms is that sometimes
    79     79   it is useful to use an algorithm other than the default.
    80     80   Suppose, for example, you are
    81     81   inserting 1000 records into a database, all within a single
    82     82   transaction, but one of those records is malformed and causes
    83     83   a constraint error.  Under PostgreSQL or Oracle, none of the
    84     84   1000 records would get inserted.  In MySQL, some subset of the
    85     85   records that appeared before the malformed record would be inserted
    86         -but the rest would not.  Neither behavior is espeically helpful.
           86  +but the rest would not.  Neither behavior is especially helpful.
    87     87   What you really want is to use the IGNORE algorithm to insert
    88     88   all but the malformed record.</p>
    89     89   
    90     90   }
    91     91   footer $rcsid

Changes to www/datatype3.tcl.

     1         -set rcsid {$Id: datatype3.tcl,v 1.7 2004/07/19 00:39:46 drh Exp $}
            1  +set rcsid {$Id: datatype3.tcl,v 1.8 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     2      2   source common.tcl
     3      3   header {Datatypes In SQLite Version 3}
     4      4   puts {
     5      5   <h2>Datatypes In SQLite Version 3</h2>
     6      6   
     7      7   <h3>1. Storage Classes</h3>
     8      8   
................................................................................
   169    169   
   170    170   	<LI><P>An INTEGER or REAL value is less than any TEXT or BLOB value.
   171    171   	When an INTEGER or REAL is compared to another INTEGER or REAL, a
   172    172   	numerical comparison is performed.</P>
   173    173   
   174    174   	<LI><P>A TEXT value is less than a BLOB value. When two TEXT values
   175    175   	are compared, the C library function memcmp() is usually used to
   176         -	determine the result. However this can be overriden, as described
          176  +	determine the result. However this can be overridden, as described
   177    177   	under 'User-defined collation Sequences' below.</P>
   178    178   
   179    179   	<LI><P>When two BLOB values are compared, the result is always
   180    180   	determined using memcmp().</P>
   181    181   </UL>
   182    182   
   183    183   <P>SQLite may attempt to convert values between the numeric storage

Changes to www/datatypes.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this script to generated a datatypes.html output file
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: datatypes.tcl,v 1.7 2004/05/31 15:06:30 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: datatypes.tcl,v 1.8 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {Datatypes In SQLite version 2}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>Datatypes In SQLite Version 2</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <h3>1.0 &nbsp; Typelessness</h3>
    11     11   <p>
................................................................................
   141    141   For SQLite version 2.6.3 and earlier, all values used the numeric datatype.
   142    142   The text datatype appears in version 2.7.0 and later.  In the sequel it
   143    143   is assumed that you are using version 2.7.0 or later of SQLite.
   144    144   </p>
   145    145   
   146    146   <p>
   147    147   For an expression, the datatype of the result is often determined by
   148         -the outermost operator.  For example, arithmatic operators ("+", "*", "%")
          148  +the outermost operator.  For example, arithmetic operators ("+", "*", "%")
   149    149   always return a numeric results.  The string concatenation operator
   150    150   ("||") returns a text result.  And so forth.  If you are ever in doubt
   151    151   about the datatype of an expression you can use the special <b>typeof()</b>
   152    152   SQL function to determine what the datatype is.  For example:
   153    153   </p>
   154    154   
   155    155   <blockquote><pre>

Changes to www/download.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this TCL script to generate HTML for the download.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: download.tcl,v 1.14 2004/08/29 18:14:18 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: download.tcl,v 1.15 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {SQLite Download Page}
     7      7   
     8      8   puts {
     9      9   <h2>SQLite Download Page</h1>
    10     10   <table width="100%" cellpadding="5">
    11     11   }
................................................................................
   114    114   <h3>Direct Access To The Sources Via Anonymous CVS</h3>
   115    115   
   116    116   <p>
   117    117   All SQLite source code is maintained in a 
   118    118   <a href="http://www.cvshome.org/">CVS</a> repository that is
   119    119   available for read-only access by anyone.  You can 
   120    120   interactively view the
   121         -respository contents and download individual files
          121  +repository contents and download individual files
   122    122   by visiting
   123    123   <a href="http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/dir?d=sqlite">
   124    124   http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/dir?d=sqlite</a>.
   125         -To access the respository directly, use the following
          125  +To access the repository directly, use the following
   126    126   commands:
   127    127   </p>
   128    128   
   129    129   <blockquote><pre>
   130    130   cvs -d :pserver:anonymous@www.sqlite.org:/sqlite login
   131    131   cvs -d :pserver:anonymous@www.sqlite.org:/sqlite checkout sqlite
   132    132   </pre></blockquote>

Changes to www/faq.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this script to generated a faq.html output file
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: faq.tcl,v 1.25 2004/09/18 18:00:24 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: faq.tcl,v 1.26 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {SQLite Frequently Asked Questions</title>}
     7      7   
     8      8   set cnt 1
     9      9   proc faq {question answer} {
    10     10     set ::faq($::cnt) [list [string trim $question] [string trim $answer]]
    11     11     incr ::cnt
................................................................................
   331    331     may not exceed 255 characters in length.</p>
   332    332   }
   333    333   
   334    334   faq {
   335    335     What is the maximum size of a VARCHAR in SQLite?
   336    336   } {
   337    337     <p>SQLite does not enforce datatype constraints.
   338         -  A VARCHAR column can hold as much data as you care to put it in.</p>
          338  +  A VARCHAR column can hold as much data as you care to put in it.</p>
   339    339   }
   340    340   
   341    341   faq {
   342    342     Does SQLite support a BLOB type?
   343    343   } {
   344    344     <p>SQLite version 3.0 lets you puts BLOB data into any column, even
   345    345     columns that are declared to hold some other type.</p>
   346    346   
   347         -  <p>SQLite version 2.8 would hold store text data without embedded
          347  +  <p>SQLite version 2.8 will store any text data without embedded
   348    348     '\000' characters.  If you need to store BLOB data in SQLite version
   349    349     2.8 you'll want to encode that data first.
   350    350     There is a source file named 
   351    351     "<b>src/encode.c</b>" in the SQLite version 2.8 distribution that contains
   352    352     implementations of functions named "<b>sqlite_encode_binary()</b>
   353    353     and <b>sqlite_decode_binary()</b> that can be used for converting
   354    354     binary data to ASCII and back again, if you like.</p>
................................................................................
   398    398     VACUUM can take some time to run (around a half second per megabyte
   399    399     on the Linux box where SQLite is developed) and it can use up to twice
   400    400     as much temporary disk space as the original file while it is running.
   401    401     </p>
   402    402   }
   403    403   
   404    404   faq {
   405         -  Can I use SQLite in my commerical product without paying royalties?
          405  +  Can I use SQLite in my commercial product without paying royalties?
   406    406   } {
   407    407     <p>Yes.  SQLite is in the public domain.  No claim of ownership is made
   408    408     to any part of the code.  You can do anything you want with it.</p>
   409    409   }
   410    410   
   411    411   faq {
   412    412     How do I use a string literal that contains an embedded single-quote (')

Changes to www/fileformat.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this script to generated a fileformat.html output file
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: fileformat.tcl,v 1.12 2004/05/31 15:06:30 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: fileformat.tcl,v 1.13 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {SQLite Database File Format (Version 2)}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>SQLite 2.X Database File Format</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <p>
    11     11   This document describes the disk file format for SQLite versions 2.1
................................................................................
    25     25   <ul>
    26     26   <li>The <b>schema</b> layer implemented by the VDBE.</li>
    27     27   <li>The <b>b-tree</b> layer implemented by btree.c</li>
    28     28   <li>The <b>pager</b> layer implemented by pager.c</li>
    29     29   </ul>
    30     30   
    31     31   <p>
    32         -We wil describe each layer beginning with the bottom (pager)
           32  +We will describe each layer beginning with the bottom (pager)
    33     33   layer and working upwards.
    34     34   </p>
    35     35   
    36     36   <h3>2.0 &nbsp; The Pager Layer</h3>
    37     37   
    38     38   <p>
    39     39   An SQLite database consists of
................................................................................
   637    637   <p>
   638    638   Column values are stored in the order that they appear in the CREATE TABLE
   639    639   statement.  The offsets at the beginning of the record contain the
   640    640   byte index of the corresponding column value.  Thus, Offset 0 contains
   641    641   the byte index for Value 0, Offset 1 contains the byte offset
   642    642   of Value 1, and so forth.  The number of bytes in a column value can
   643    643   always be found by subtracting offsets.  This allows NULLs to be
   644         -recovered from the record unabiguously.
          644  +recovered from the record unambiguously.
   645    645   </p>
   646    646   
   647    647   <p>
   648    648   Most columns are stored in the b-tree data as described above.
   649    649   The one exception is column that has type INTEGER PRIMARY KEY.
   650    650   INTEGER PRIMARY KEY columns correspond to the 4-byte b-tree key.
   651    651   When an SQL statement attempts to read the INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
................................................................................
   674    674   a string that has been crafted so that sorting the string using memcmp()
   675    675   will sort the corresponding numbers in numerical order.  (See the
   676    676   sqliteRealToSortable() function in util.c of the SQLite sources for
   677    677   additional information on this encoding.)  Numbers are also nul-terminated.
   678    678   Text values consists of the character 'c' followed by a copy of the
   679    679   text string and a nul-terminator.  These encoding rules result in
   680    680   NULLs being sorted first, followed by numerical values in numerical
   681         -order, followed by text values in lexigraphical order.
          681  +order, followed by text values in lexicographical order.
   682    682   </p>
   683    683   
   684    684   <h4>4.4 &nbsp; SQL Schema Storage And Root B-Tree Page Numbers</h4>
   685    685   
   686    686   <p>
   687    687   The database schema is stored in the database in a special tabled named
   688    688   "sqlite_master" and which always has a root b-tree page number of 2.

Changes to www/formatchng.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the formatchng.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: formatchng.tcl,v 1.11 2004/06/16 03:02:04 drh Exp $ }
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: formatchng.tcl,v 1.12 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $ }
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {File Format Changes in SQLite}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>File Format Changes in SQLite</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <p>
    11     11   From time to time, enhancements or bug fixes require a change to
................................................................................
   150    150   </tr>
   151    151   <tr>
   152    152     <td valign="top">2.7.6 to 2.8.0</td>
   153    153     <td valign="top">2003-Feb-14</td>
   154    154     <td><p>Version 2.8.0 introduces a change to the format of the rollback
   155    155     journal file.  The main database file format is unchanged.  Versions
   156    156     2.7.6 and earlier can read and write 2.8.0 databases and vice versa.
   157         -  Version 2.8.0 can rollback a transation that was started by version
          157  +  Version 2.8.0 can rollback a transaction that was started by version
   158    158     2.7.6 and earlier.  But version 2.7.6 and earlier cannot rollback a
   159    159     transaction started by version 2.8.0 or later.</p>
   160    160   
   161    161     <p>The only time this would ever be an issue is when you have a program
   162    162     using version 2.8.0 or later that crashes with an incomplete
   163    163     transaction, then you try to examine the database using version 2.7.6 or
   164    164     earlier.  The 2.7.6 code will not be able to read the journal file

Changes to www/lang.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the sqlite.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: lang.tcl,v 1.73 2004/10/05 02:41:43 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: lang.tcl,v 1.74 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {Query Language Understood by SQLite}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>SQL As Understood By SQLite</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <p>The SQLite library understands most of the standard SQL
    11     11   language.  But it does <a href="omitted.html">omit some features</a>
    12     12   while at the same time
    13     13   adding a few features of its own.  This document attempts to
    14         -describe percisely what parts of the SQL language SQLite does
           14  +describe precisely what parts of the SQL language SQLite does
    15     15   and does not support.  A list of <a href="#keywords">keywords</a> is 
    16     16   given at the end.</p>
    17     17   
    18     18   <p>In all of the syntax diagrams that follow, literal text is shown in
    19     19   bold blue.  Non-terminal symbols are shown in italic red.  Operators
    20     20   that are part of the syntactic markup itself are shown in black roman.</p>
    21     21   
................................................................................
   198    198   
   199    199   <p>
   200    200   Transactions can be started manually using the BEGIN
   201    201   command.  Such transactions usually persist until the next
   202    202   COMMIT or ROLLBACK command.  But a transaction will also 
   203    203   ROLLBACK if the database is closed or if an error occurs
   204    204   and the ROLLBACK conflict resolution algorithm is specified.
   205         -See the documention on the <a href="#conflict">ON CONFLICT</a>
          205  +See the documentation on the <a href="#conflict">ON CONFLICT</a>
   206    206   clause for additional information about the ROLLBACK
   207    207   conflict resolution algorithm.
   208    208   </p>
   209    209   
   210    210   <p>
   211    211   In SQLite version 3.0.8 and later, transactions can be deferred,
   212    212   immediate, or exclusive.  Deferred means that no locks are acquired
................................................................................
   214    214   deferred transaction, the BEGIN statement itself does nothing.  Locks
   215    215   are not acquired until the first read or write operation.  The first read
   216    216   operation against a database creates a SHARED lock and the first
   217    217   write operation creates a RESERVED lock.   Because the acquisition of
   218    218   locks is deferred until they are needed, it is possible that another
   219    219   thread or process could create a separate transaction and write to
   220    220   the database after the BEGIN on the current thread has executed.
   221         -If the transation is immediate, then RESERVED locks
          221  +If the transaction is immediate, then RESERVED locks
   222    222   are acquired on all databases as soon as the BEGIN command is
   223    223   executed, without waiting for the
   224    224   database to be used.  After a BEGIN IMMEDIATE, you are guaranteed that
   225    225   no other thread or process will be able to write to the database or
   226    226   do a BEGIN IMMEDIATE or BEGIN EXCLUSIVE.  Other processes can continue
   227    227   to read from the database, however.  An exclusive transaction causes
   228    228   EXCLUSIVE locks to be acquired on all databases.  After a BEGIN
................................................................................
   867    867   &lt;&lt;   &gt;&gt;   &amp;    |
   868    868   &lt;    &lt;=   &gt;    &gt;=
   869    869   =    ==   !=   &lt;&gt;   </big>IN
   870    870   AND   
   871    871   OR</font>
   872    872   </pre></blockquote>
   873    873   
   874         -<p>Supported unary operaters are these:</p>
          874  +<p>Supported unary operators are these:</p>
   875    875   
   876    876   <blockquote><pre>
   877    877   <font color="#2c2cf0"><big>-    +    !    ~</big></font>
   878    878   </pre></blockquote>
   879    879   
   880    880   <p>Any SQLite value can be used as part of an expression.  
   881    881   For arithmetic operations, integers are treated as integers.
................................................................................
   890    890   The [Operator ||] operator is \"concatenate\" - it joins together
   891    891   the two strings of its operands.
   892    892   The operator [Operator %] outputs the remainder of its left 
   893    893   operand modulo its right operand.</p>"
   894    894   puts {
   895    895   
   896    896   <a name="like"></a>
   897         -<p>The LIKE operator does a wildcard comparision.  The operand
          897  +<p>The LIKE operator does a wildcard comparison.  The operand
   898    898   to the right contains the wildcards.}
   899    899   puts "A percent symbol [Operator %] in the right operand
   900    900   matches any sequence of zero or more characters on the left.
   901    901   An underscore [Operator _] on the right
   902    902   matches any single character on the left."
   903    903   puts {The LIKE operator is
   904    904   not case sensitive and will match upper case characters on one
................................................................................
   947    947   the values generated by the select.  The IN operator may be preceded
   948    948   by the NOT keyword to invert the sense of the test.</p>
   949    949   
   950    950   <p>When a SELECT appears within an expression but is not the right
   951    951   operand of an IN operator, then the first row of the result of the
   952    952   SELECT becomes the value used in the expression.  If the SELECT yields
   953    953   more than one result row, all rows after the first are ignored.  If
   954         -the SELECT yeilds no rows, then the value of the SELECT is NULL.</p>
          954  +the SELECT yields no rows, then the value of the SELECT is NULL.</p>
   955    955   
   956    956   <p>Both simple and aggregate functions are supported.  A simple
   957    957   function can be used in any expression.  Simple functions return
   958    958   a result immediately based on their inputs.  Aggregate functions
   959    959   may only be used in a SELECT statement.  Aggregate functions compute
   960    960   their result across all rows of the result set.</p>
   961    961   
................................................................................
  1036   1036   it has 2 or more arguments but converts to an aggregate function if given
  1037   1037   only a single argument.</td>
  1038   1038   </tr>
  1039   1039   
  1040   1040   <tr>
  1041   1041   <td valign="top" align="right">min(<i>X</i>,<i>Y</i>,...)</td>
  1042   1042   <td valign="top">Return the argument with the minimum value.  Arguments
  1043         -may be strings in addition to numbers.  The mminimum value is determined
         1043  +may be strings in addition to numbers.  The minimum value is determined
  1044   1044   by the usual sort order.  Note that <b>min()</b> is a simple function when
  1045   1045   it has 2 or more arguments but converts to an aggregate function if given
  1046   1046   only a single argument.</td>
  1047   1047   </tr>
  1048   1048   
  1049   1049   <tr>
  1050   1050   <td valign="top" align="right">nullif(<i>X</i>,<i>Y</i>)</td>
................................................................................
  1257   1257   or updating the current row.  Thus the insert or update always occurs.
  1258   1258   The command continues executing normally.  No error is returned.
  1259   1259   If a NOT NULL constraint violation occurs, the NULL value is replaced
  1260   1260   by the default value for that column.  If the column has no default
  1261   1261   value, then the ABORT algorithm is used.</p>
  1262   1262   
  1263   1263   <p>When this conflict resolution strategy deletes rows in order to
  1264         -statisfy a constraint, it does not invoke delete triggers on those
         1264  +satisfy a constraint, it does not invoke delete triggers on those
  1265   1265   rows.  But that may change in a future release.</p>
  1266   1266   
  1267   1267   <p>The algorithm specified in the OR clause of a COPY, INSERT, or UPDATE
  1268   1268   overrides any algorithm specified in a CREATE TABLE or CREATE INDEX.
  1269   1269   If no algorithm is specified anywhere, the ABORT algorithm is used.</p>
  1270   1270   
  1271   1271   }
................................................................................
  1311   1311       to the default value when the database is closed and reopened.  Use
  1312   1312       the <a href="#pragma_default_cache_size"><b>default_cache_size</b></a> 
  1313   1313       pragma to check the cache size permanently.</p></li>
  1314   1314   
  1315   1315   <li><p><b>PRAGMA database_list;</b></p>
  1316   1316       <p>For each open database, invoke the callback function once with
  1317   1317       information about that database.  Arguments include the index and 
  1318         -    the name the datbase was attached with.  The first row will be for 
         1318  +    the name the database was attached with.  The first row will be for 
  1319   1319       the main database.  The second row will be for the database used to 
  1320   1320       store temporary tables.</p></li>
  1321   1321   
  1322   1322   <a name="pragma_default_cache_size"></a>
  1323   1323   <li><p><b>PRAGMA default_cache_size;
  1324   1324          <br>PRAGMA default_cache_size = </b><i>Number-of-pages</i><b>;</b></p>
  1325   1325       <p>Query or change the maximum number of database disk pages that SQLite
................................................................................
  1629   1629   Section VACUUM vacuum
  1630   1630   
  1631   1631   Syntax {sql-statement} {
  1632   1632   VACUUM [<index-or-table-name>]
  1633   1633   }
  1634   1634   
  1635   1635   puts {
  1636         -<p>The VACUUM command is an SQLite extension modelled after a similar
         1636  +<p>The VACUUM command is an SQLite extension modeled after a similar
  1637   1637   command found in PostgreSQL.  If VACUUM is invoked with the name of a
  1638   1638   table or index then it is suppose to clean up the named table or index.
  1639   1639   In version 1.0 of SQLite, the VACUUM command would invoke 
  1640   1640   <b>gdbm_reorganize()</b> to clean up the backend database file.</p>
  1641   1641   
  1642   1642   <p>
  1643   1643   VACUUM became a no-op when the GDBM backend was removed from
  1644   1644   SQLITE in version 2.0.0.
  1645         -VACUUM was reimplimented in version 2.8.1.
         1645  +VACUUM was reimplemented in version 2.8.1.
  1646   1646   The index or table name argument is now ignored.
  1647   1647   </p>
  1648   1648   
  1649   1649   <p>When an object (table, index, or trigger) is dropped from the 
  1650   1650   database, it leaves behind empty space.  This makes the database 
  1651   1651   file larger than it needs to be, but can speed up inserts.  In time 
  1652   1652   inserts and deletes can leave the database file structure fragmented, 
................................................................................
  1682   1682   <tr>	<td width=12%> 'keyword'
  1683   1683   	<td>Interpreted as a literal string if it occurs in a legal string 
  1684   1684   	context, otherwise as an identifier.
  1685   1685   <tr>	<td> "keyword"
  1686   1686   	<td>Interpreted as an identifier if it matches a known identifier 
  1687   1687   	and occurs in a legal identifier context, otherwise as a string. 
  1688   1688   <tr>	<td> [keyword]
  1689         -	<td> Always interpreted as an identifer. (This notation is used 
         1689  +	<td> Always interpreted as an identifier. (This notation is used 
  1690   1690   	by MS Access and SQL Server.)
  1691   1691   </table>
  1692   1692   
  1693   1693   <h2>Fallback Keywords</h2>
  1694   1694   
  1695   1695   <p>These keywords can be used as identifiers for SQLite objects without 
  1696   1696   delimiters.</p>

Changes to www/nulls.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this script to generated a nulls.html output file
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: nulls.tcl,v 1.7 2004/08/30 14:58:12 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: nulls.tcl,v 1.8 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {NULL Handling in SQLite}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>NULL Handling in SQLite Versus Other Database Engines</h2>
     9      9   
    10     10   <p>
    11     11   The goal is
................................................................................
    26     26   The original tests were run in May of 2002.
    27     27   A copy of the test script is found at the end of this document.
    28     28   </p>
    29     29   
    30     30   <p>
    31     31   SQLite was originally coded in such a way that the answer to
    32     32   all questions in the chart below would be "Yes".  But the
    33         -expriments run on other SQL engines showed that none of them
           33  +experiments run on other SQL engines showed that none of them
    34     34   worked this way.  So SQLite was modified to work the same as
    35     35   Oracle, PostgreSQL, and DB2.  This involved making NULLs
    36     36   indistinct for the purposes of the SELECT DISTINCT statement and
    37     37   for the UNION operator in a SELECT.  NULLs are still distinct
    38     38   in a UNIQUE column.  This seems somewhat arbitrary, but the desire
    39     39   to be compatible with other engines outweighted that objection.
    40     40   </p>

Changes to www/oldnews.tcl.

    90     90     The 2.8 series of SQLite will continue to be supported with bug
    91     91     fixes for the foreseeable future.
    92     92   }
    93     93   
    94     94   newsitem {2004-Jun-09} {Version 2.8.14 Released} {
    95     95     SQLite version 2.8.14 is a patch release to the stable 2.8 series.
    96     96     There is no reason to upgrade if 2.8.13 is working ok for you.
    97         -  This is only a bug-fix release.  Most developement effort is
           97  +  This is only a bug-fix release.  Most development effort is
    98     98     going into version 3.0.0 which is due out soon.
    99     99   }
   100    100   
   101    101   newsitem {2004-May-31} {CVS Access Temporarily Disabled} {
   102    102     Anonymous access to the CVS repository will be suspended
   103    103     for 2 weeks beginning on 2004-June-04.  Everyone will still
   104    104     be able to download
................................................................................
   112    112     changes to both the C-language API and the underlying file format
   113    113     that will enable SQLite to better support internationalization.
   114    114     The first beta is schedule for release on 2004-July-01.
   115    115   
   116    116     Plans are to continue to support SQLite version 2.8 with
   117    117     bug fixes.  But all new development will occur in version 3.0.
   118    118   }
   119         -footer {$Id: oldnews.tcl,v 1.5 2004/09/18 18:00:24 drh Exp $}
          119  +footer {$Id: oldnews.tcl,v 1.6 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}

Changes to www/opcode.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the sqlite.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: opcode.tcl,v 1.13 2004/05/31 15:06:30 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: opcode.tcl,v 1.14 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {SQLite Virtual Machine Opcodes}
     7      7   puts {
     8      8   <h2>SQLite Virtual Machine Opcodes</h2>
     9      9   }
    10     10   
    11     11   set fd [open [lindex $argv 0] r]
................................................................................
    62     62   <p>The source code to the virtual machine is in the <b>vdbe.c</b> source
    63     63   file.  All of the opcode definitions further down in this document are
    64     64   contained in comments in the source file.  In fact, the opcode table
    65     65   in this document
    66     66   was generated by scanning the <b>vdbe.c</b> source file 
    67     67   and extracting the necessary information from comments.  So the 
    68     68   source code comments are really the canonical source of information
    69         -about the virtual macchine.  When in doubt, refer to the source code.</p>
           69  +about the virtual machine.  When in doubt, refer to the source code.</p>
    70     70   
    71     71   <p>Each instruction in the virtual machine consists of an opcode and
    72     72   up to three operands named P1, P2 and P3.  P1 may be an arbitrary
    73     73   integer.  P2 must be a non-negative integer.  P2 is always the
    74     74   jump destination in any operation that might cause a jump.
    75     75   P3 is a null-terminated
    76     76   string or NULL.  Some operators use all three operands.  Some use

Changes to www/speed.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this Tcl script to generate the speed.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: speed.tcl,v 1.14 2004/05/31 15:06:30 drh Exp $ }
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: speed.tcl,v 1.15 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $ }
     5      5   source common.tcl
     6      6   header {SQLite Database Speed Comparison}
     7      7   
     8      8   puts {
     9      9   <h2>Database Speed Comparison</h2>
    10     10   
    11     11   <h3>Executive Summary</h3>
................................................................................
    71     71   tests.
    72     72   </p>
    73     73   
    74     74   <p>
    75     75   I am told that the default PostgreSQL configuration in RedHat 7.3
    76     76   is unnecessarily conservative (it is designed to
    77     77   work on a machine with 8MB of RAM) and that PostgreSQL could
    78         -be made to run a lot faster with some knowledgable configuration
           78  +be made to run a lot faster with some knowledgeable configuration
    79     79   tuning.
    80     80   Matt Sergeant reports that he has tuned his PostgreSQL installation
    81     81   and rerun the tests shown below.  His results show that
    82     82   PostgreSQL and MySQL run at about the same speed.  For Matt's
    83     83   results, visit
    84     84   </p>
    85     85   
................................................................................
   244    244   <tr><td>MySQL:</td><td align="right">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;4.640</td></tr>
   245    245   <tr><td>SQLite 2.7.6:</td><td align="right">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;3.362</td></tr>
   246    246   <tr><td>SQLite 2.7.6 (nosync):</td><td align="right">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;3.372</td></tr>
   247    247   </table>
   248    248   
   249    249   <p>
   250    250   This test still does 100 full table scans but it uses
   251         -uses string comparisons instead of numerical comparisions.
          251  +uses string comparisons instead of numerical comparisons.
   252    252   SQLite is over three times faster than PostgreSQL here and about 30%
   253    253   faster than MySQL.
   254    254   </p>
   255    255   
   256    256   <h3>Test 6: Creating an index</h3>
   257    257   <blockquote>
   258    258   CREATE INDEX i2a ON t2(a);<br>CREATE INDEX i2b ON t2(b);

Changes to www/whentouse.tcl.

     1      1   #
     2      2   # Run this TCL script to generate HTML for the goals.html file.
     3      3   #
     4         -set rcsid {$Id: whentouse.tcl,v 1.1 2004/01/27 15:58:38 drh Exp $}
            4  +set rcsid {$Id: whentouse.tcl,v 1.2 2004/10/10 17:24:55 drh Exp $}
     5      5   
     6      6   puts {<html>
     7      7   <head><title>Appropriate Uses of SQLite</title></head>
     8      8   <body bgcolor=white>
     9      9   <h1 align=center>Appropriate Uses Of SQLite</h1>
    10     10   }
    11     11   puts "<p align=center>
................................................................................
    34     34   but first and foremost, SQLite strives to be simple.
    35     35   </p>
    36     36   
    37     37   <p>
    38     38   Simplicity in a database engine can be either a strength or a
    39     39   weakness, depending on what you are trying to do.  In order to
    40     40   achieve simplicity, SQLite has had to sacrifice other characteristics
    41         -that some people find useful, such as high concurrancy, fine-grained
           41  +that some people find useful, such as high concurrency, fine-grained
    42     42   access control, a rich set of built-in functions, stored procedures,
    43     43   esoteric SQL language features, XML and/or Java extensions,
    44     44   tera- or peta-byte scalability, and so forth.  If you need these
    45     45   kinds of features and don't mind the added complexity that they
    46     46   bring, then SQLite is probably not the database for you.
    47     47   SQLite is not intended to be an enterprise database engine.  It
    48     48   not designed to compete with Oracle or PostgreSQL.
................................................................................
   146    146   a colleague.
   147    147   </p>
   148    148   </li>
   149    149   
   150    150   <li><p><b>Stand-in for an enterprise database during demos or testing</b></p>
   151    151   
   152    152   <p>
   153         -If you are writting a client application for an enterprise database engine,
          153  +If you are writing a client application for an enterprise database engine,
   154    154   it makes sense to use a generic database backend that allows you to connect
   155    155   to many different kinds of SQL database engines.  It makes even better
   156    156   sense to
   157    157   go ahead and include SQLite in the mix of supported database and to statically
   158    158   link the SQLite engine in with the client.  That way the client program
   159    159   can be used standalone with an SQLite data file for testing or for
   160    160   demonstrations.
................................................................................
   203    203   it might be possible for two or more client programs to modify the
   204    204   same part of the same database at the same time, resulting in 
   205    205   database corruption.  Because this problem results from bugs in
   206    206   the underlying filesystem implementation, there is nothing SQLite
   207    207   can do to prevent it.</p>
   208    208   
   209    209   <p>A good rule of thumb is that you should avoid using SQLite
   210         -in situations where the same database will be accessed simultenously
          210  +in situations where the same database will be accessed simultaneously
   211    211   from many computers over a network filesystem.</p>
   212    212   </li>
   213    213   
   214    214   <li><p><b>High-volume Websites</b></p>
   215    215   
   216    216   <p>SQLite will normally work fine as the database backend to a website.
   217         -But if you website is so busy that your are thinking of splitted the
          217  +But if you website is so busy that your are thinking of splitting the
   218    218   database component off onto a separate machine, then you should 
   219    219   definitely consider using an enterprise-class client/server database
   220    220   engine instead of SQLite.</p>
   221    221   </li>
   222    222   
   223    223   <li><p><b>Very large datasets</b></p>
   224    224   
................................................................................
   230    230   required is not a problem, but when database begin to grow into the
   231    231   multi-gigabyte range, the size of the bitmap can get quite large.  If
   232    232   you need to store and modify more than a few dozen GB of data, you should
   233    233   consider using a different database engine.
   234    234   </p>
   235    235   </li>
   236    236   
   237         -<li><p><b>High Concurrancy</b></p>
          237  +<li><p><b>High Concurrency</b></p>
   238    238   
   239    239   <p>
   240    240   SQLite uses reader/writer locks on the entire database file.  That means
   241    241   if any process is reading from any part of the database, all other
   242    242   processes are prevented from writing any other part of the database.
   243    243   Similarly, if any one process is writing to any part of the database,
   244    244   all other processes are prevented from reading any other part of the
   245    245   database.
   246    246   For many situations, this is not a problem.  Each application
   247    247   does its database work quickly and moves on, and no lock lasts for more
   248    248   than a few dozen milliseconds.  But there are some problems that require
   249         -more concurrancy, and those problems will need to seek a different
          249  +more concurrency, and those problems will need to seek a different
   250    250   solution.
   251    251   </p>
   252    252   </li>
   253    253   
   254    254   </ul>
   255    255   
   256    256   }