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Overview
Comment:Documentation spellcheck and cleanup. No changes to code. (CVS 5258)
Downloads: Tarball | ZIP archive | SQL archive
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1: 2904d26ba43b0ded5b43f696ba2d8cd19d4244de
User & Date: mihailim 2008-06-21 06:16:43
Context
2008-06-21
08:12
Fix a problem in the test suite that could cause a crash if using a pre-allocated block of memory for pages (the problem was that sqlite3_shutdown() was being called while there were still open database connections). (CVS 5259) check-in: 3d413e9b user: danielk1977 tags: trunk
06:16
Documentation spellcheck and cleanup. No changes to code. (CVS 5258) check-in: 2904d26b user: mihailim tags: trunk
2008-06-20
18:13
Add new Compare and Jump codes to the virtual machine. Use them in the implementation of aggregate queries. (CVS 5257) check-in: 08311365 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to src/sqlite.h.in.

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** on how SQLite interfaces are suppose to operate.
**
** The name of this file under configuration management is "sqlite.h.in".
** The makefile makes some minor changes to this file (such as inserting
** the version number) and changes its name to "sqlite3.h" as
** part of the build process.
**
** @(#) $Id: sqlite.h.in,v 1.342 2008/06/20 14:59:51 danielk1977 Exp $
*/
#ifndef _SQLITE3_H_
#define _SQLITE3_H_
#include <stdarg.h>     /* Needed for the definition of va_list */

/*
** Make sure we can call this stuff from C++.
................................................................................
** Add the ability to override 'extern'
*/
#ifndef SQLITE_EXTERN
# define SQLITE_EXTERN extern
#endif

/*
** Make sure these symbols where not defined by some previous header
** file.
*/
#ifdef SQLITE_VERSION
# undef SQLITE_VERSION
#endif
#ifdef SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER
# undef SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER
#endif
................................................................................
** The SQLITE_VERSION and SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER #defines in
** the sqlite3.h file specify the version of SQLite with which
** that header file is associated.
**
** The "version" of SQLite is a string of the form "X.Y.Z".
** The phrase "alpha" or "beta" might be appended after the Z.
** The X value is major version number always 3 in SQLite3.
** The X value only changes when  backwards compatibility is
** broken and we intend to never break
** backwards compatibility.  The Y value is the minor version
** number and only changes when
** there are major feature enhancements that are forwards compatible
** but not backwards compatible.  The Z value is release number
** and is incremented with
** each release but resets back to 0 when Y is incremented.
**
** See also: [sqlite3_libversion()] and [sqlite3_libversion_number()].
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10011} The SQLITE_VERSION #define in the sqlite3.h header file
**          evaluates to a string literal that is the SQLite version
**          with which the header file is associated.
**
** {F10014} The SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER #define resolves to an integer
**          with the value  (X*1000000 + Y*1000 + Z) where X, Y, and
**          Z are the major version, minor version, and release number.
*/
#define SQLITE_VERSION         "--VERS--"
#define SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER  --VERSION-NUMBER--

/*
** CAPI3REF: Run-Time Library Version Numbers {F10020}
** KEYWORDS: sqlite3_version
**
** These features provide the same information as the [SQLITE_VERSION]
** and [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER] #defines in the header, but are associated
** with the library instead of the header file.  Cautious programmers might
** include a check in their application to verify that 
** sqlite3_libversion_number() always returns the value 
** [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER].
**
** The sqlite3_libversion() function returns the same information as is
** in the sqlite3_version[] string constant.  The function is provided
** for use in DLLs since DLL users usually do not have direct access to string
** constants within the DLL.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10021} The [sqlite3_libversion_number()] interface returns an integer
**          equal to [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER]. 
**
** {F10022} The [sqlite3_version] string constant contains the text of the
**          [SQLITE_VERSION] string. 
**
** {F10023} The [sqlite3_libversion()] function returns
**          a pointer to the [sqlite3_version] string constant.
*/
SQLITE_EXTERN const char sqlite3_version[];
const char *sqlite3_libversion(void);
int sqlite3_libversion_number(void);
................................................................................
/*
** CAPI3REF: Test To See If The Library Is Threadsafe {F10100}
**
** SQLite can be compiled with or without mutexes.  When
** the SQLITE_THREADSAFE C preprocessor macro is true, mutexes
** are enabled and SQLite is threadsafe.  When that macro is false,
** the mutexes are omitted.  Without the mutexes, it is not safe
** to use SQLite from more than one thread.
**
** There is a measurable performance penalty for enabling mutexes.
** So if speed is of utmost importance, it makes sense to disable
** the mutexes.  But for maximum safety, mutexes should be enabled.
** The default behavior is for mutexes to be enabled.
**
** This interface can be used by a program to make sure that the
** version of SQLite that it is linking against was compiled with
** the desired setting of the SQLITE_THREADSAFE macro.
................................................................................
**
** {F10101} The [sqlite3_threadsafe()] function returns nonzero if
**          SQLite was compiled with its mutexes enabled or zero
**          if SQLite was compiled with mutexes disabled.
*/
int sqlite3_threadsafe(void);


/*
** CAPI3REF: Database Connection Handle {F12000}
** KEYWORDS: {database connection} {database connections}
**
** Each open SQLite database is represented by pointer to an instance of the
** opaque structure named "sqlite3".  It is useful to think of an sqlite3
** pointer as an object.  The [sqlite3_open()], [sqlite3_open16()], and
** [sqlite3_open_v2()] interfaces are its constructors
** and [sqlite3_close()] is its destructor.  There are many other interfaces
** (such as [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_create_function()], and
** [sqlite3_busy_timeout()] to name but three) that are methods on this
** object.
*/
typedef struct sqlite3 sqlite3;


/*
** CAPI3REF: 64-Bit Integer Types {F10200}
** KEYWORDS: sqlite_int64 sqlite_uint64
**
** Because there is no cross-platform way to specify 64-bit integer types
** SQLite includes typedefs for 64-bit signed and unsigned integers.
**
** The sqlite3_int64 and sqlite3_uint64 are the preferred type
** definitions.  The sqlite_int64 and sqlite_uint64 types are
** supported for backwards compatibility only.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10201} The [sqlite_int64] and [sqlite3_int64] types specify a
**          64-bit signed integer.
**
** {F10202} The [sqlite_uint64] and [sqlite3_uint64] types specify
**          a 64-bit unsigned integer.
*/
#ifdef SQLITE_INT64_TYPE
  typedef SQLITE_INT64_TYPE sqlite_int64;
  typedef unsigned SQLITE_INT64_TYPE sqlite_uint64;
................................................................................
  typedef unsigned long long int sqlite_uint64;
#endif
typedef sqlite_int64 sqlite3_int64;
typedef sqlite_uint64 sqlite3_uint64;

/*
** If compiling for a processor that lacks floating point support,
** substitute integer for floating-point
*/
#ifdef SQLITE_OMIT_FLOATING_POINT
# define double sqlite3_int64
#endif

/*
** CAPI3REF: Closing A Database Connection {F12010}
**
** This routine is the destructor for the [sqlite3] object.  
**
** Applications should [sqlite3_finalize | finalize] all
** [prepared statements] and
** [sqlite3_blob_close | close] all [sqlite3_blob | BLOBs] 
** associated with the [sqlite3] object prior
** to attempting to close the [sqlite3] object.  The
** [sqlite3_next_stmt()] interface can be used to locate all
** [prepared statements] associated with a [database connection]
** if desired.  Typical code might look like this:
**
** <blockquote><pre>
** sqlite3_stmt *pStmt;
** while( (pStmt = sqlite3_next_stmt(db, 0))!=0 ){
** &nbsp;   sqlite3_finalize(pStmt);
** }
** </pre></blockquote>
**
** If [sqlite3_close()] is invoked while a transaction is opened,
** the transaction is automatically rolled back.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F12011} The [sqlite3_close()] interface destroys an [sqlite3] object
**          allocated by a prior call to [sqlite3_open()],
**          [sqlite3_open16()], or [sqlite3_open_v2()].
**
** {F12012} The [sqlite3_close()] function releases all memory used by the
**          connection and closes all open files.
**
** {F12013} If the database connection contains
**          [prepared statements] that have not been
**          finalized by [sqlite3_finalize()], then [sqlite3_close()]
**          returns [SQLITE_BUSY] and leaves the connection open.
**
** {F12014} Giving sqlite3_close() a NULL pointer is a harmless no-op.
**
** {F12019} When [sqlite3_close()] is invoked on a [database connection]
**          that has a pending transaction, the transaction shall be
**          rolled back.
**
** LIMITATIONS:
**
** {U12015} The parameter to [sqlite3_close()] must be an [sqlite3] object
**          pointer previously obtained from [sqlite3_open()] or the 
**          equivalent, or NULL.
**
** {U12016} The parameter to [sqlite3_close()] must not have been previously
**          closed.
*/
int sqlite3_close(sqlite3 *);

................................................................................
** compatibility and is not documented.
*/
typedef int (*sqlite3_callback)(void*,int,char**, char**);

/*
** CAPI3REF: One-Step Query Execution Interface {F12100}
**
** The sqlite3_exec() interface is a convenient way of running
** one or more SQL statements without a lot of C code.  The
** SQL statements are passed in as the second parameter to
** sqlite3_exec().  The statements are evaluated one by one
** until either an error or an interrupt is encountered or
** until they are all done.  The 3rd parameter is an optional
** callback that is invoked once for each row of any query results
** produced by the SQL statements.  The 5th parameter tells where
** to write any error messages.
**
** The error message passed back through the 5th parameter is held
** in memory obtained from [sqlite3_malloc()].  To avoid a memory leak,
** the calling application should call [sqlite3_free()] on any error
** message returned through the 5th parameter when it has finished using
** the error message.
**
** If the SQL statement in the 2nd parameter is NULL or an empty string
** or a string containing only whitespace and comments, then SQL
** statements are evaluated and the database is unchanged.
**
** The sqlite3_exec() interface is implemented in terms of
** [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_step()], and [sqlite3_finalize()].
** The sqlite3_exec() routine does nothing to the database that cannot be done
** by [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_step()], and [sqlite3_finalize()].
**
** INVARIANTS:
** 
** {F12101} A successful invocation of [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)]
**          shall evaluate all of the UTF-8 encoded, semicolon-separated,
**          SQL statements in the zero-terminated string S within the
**          context of the D [database connection].
**
** {F12102} If the S parameter to [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] is NULL then
**          the actions of the interface shall be the same as if the
**          S parameter where an empty string.
**
** {F12104} The return value of [sqlite3_exec()] shall be [SQLITE_OK] if all
**          SQL statements run successfully and to completion.
**
** {F12105} The return value of [sqlite3_exec()] shall be an appropriate 
**          non-zero [error code] if any SQL statement fails.
**
................................................................................
** {F12134} The [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] routine shall set the value of
**          *E to NULL if E is not NULL and there are no errors.
**
** {F12137} The [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] function shall set the error code
**          and message accessible via [sqlite3_errcode()],
**          [sqlite3_errmsg()], and [sqlite3_errmsg16()].
**
** {F12138} If the S parameter to [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] is a null or empty
**          string or contains nothing other than whitespace, comments, and/or
**          semicolons, then results of [sqlite3_errcode()],
**          [sqlite3_errmsg()], and [sqlite3_errmsg16()]
**          shall reset to indicate no errors.
**
** LIMITATIONS:
**
** {U12141} The first parameter to [sqlite3_exec()] must be an valid and open
**          [database connection].
................................................................................

/*
** CAPI3REF: Extended Result Codes {F10220}
** KEYWORDS: {extended error code} {extended error codes}
** KEYWORDS: {extended result codes}
**
** In its default configuration, SQLite API routines return one of 26 integer
** [SQLITE_OK | result codes].  However, experience has shown that
** many of these result codes are too course-grained.  They do not provide as
** much information about problems as programmers might like.  In an effort to
** address this, newer versions of SQLite (version 3.3.8 and later) include
** support for additional result codes that provide more detailed information
** about errors. The extended result codes are enabled or disabled
** for each database connection using the [sqlite3_extended_result_codes()]
** API.
** 
** Some of the available extended result codes are listed here.
** One may expect the number of extended result codes will be expand
** over time.  Software that uses extended result codes should expect
** to see new result codes in future releases of SQLite.
**
** The SQLITE_OK result code will never be extended.  It will always
................................................................................
** to use normal fsync() semantics. The SQLITE_SYNC_FULL flag means 
** to use Mac OS-X style fullsync instead of fsync().
*/
#define SQLITE_SYNC_NORMAL        0x00002
#define SQLITE_SYNC_FULL          0x00003
#define SQLITE_SYNC_DATAONLY      0x00010


/*
** CAPI3REF: OS Interface Open File Handle {F11110}
**
** An [sqlite3_file] object represents an open file in the OS
** interface layer.  Individual OS interface implementations will
** want to subclass this object by appending additional fields
** for their own use.  The pMethods entry is a pointer to an
................................................................................
**
** Every file opened by the [sqlite3_vfs] xOpen method contains a pointer to
** an instance of this object.  This object defines the
** methods used to perform various operations against the open file.
**
** The flags argument to xSync may be one of [SQLITE_SYNC_NORMAL] or
** [SQLITE_SYNC_FULL].  The first choice is the normal fsync().
*  The second choice is an
** OS-X style fullsync.  The SQLITE_SYNC_DATA flag may be ORed in to
** indicate that only the data of the file and not its inode needs to be
** synced.
** 
** The integer values to xLock() and xUnlock() are one of
** <ul>
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_NONE],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_SHARED],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_RESERVED],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_PENDING], or
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_EXCLUSIVE].
** </ul>
** xLock() increases the lock. xUnlock() decreases the lock.  
** The xCheckReservedLock() method looks
** to see if any database connection, either in this
** process or in some other process, is holding an RESERVED,
** PENDING, or EXCLUSIVE lock on the file.  It returns true
** if such a lock exists and false if not.
** 
** The xFileControl() method is a generic interface that allows custom
** VFS implementations to directly control an open file using the
** [sqlite3_file_control()] interface.  The second "op" argument
** is an integer opcode.   The third
** argument is a generic pointer which is intended to be a pointer
** to a structure that may contain arguments or space in which to
** write return values.  Potential uses for xFileControl() might be
** functions to enable blocking locks with timeouts, to change the
** locking strategy (for example to use dot-file locks), to inquire
** about the status of a lock, or to break stale locks.  The SQLite
** core reserves opcodes less than 100 for its own use. 
** A [SQLITE_FCNTL_LOCKSTATE | list of opcodes] less than 100 is available.
** Applications that define a custom xFileControl method should use opcodes 
** greater than 100 to avoid conflicts.
**
** The xSectorSize() method returns the sector size of the
** device that underlies the file.  The sector size is the
** minimum write that can be performed without disturbing
** other bytes in the file.  The xDeviceCharacteristics()
** method returns a bit vector describing behaviors of the
................................................................................
  /* Additional methods may be added in future releases */
};

/*
** CAPI3REF: Standard File Control Opcodes {F11310}
**
** These integer constants are opcodes for the xFileControl method
** of the [sqlite3_io_methods] object and to the [sqlite3_file_control()]
** interface.
**
** The [SQLITE_FCNTL_LOCKSTATE] opcode is used for debugging.  This
** opcode causes the xFileControl method to write the current state of
** the lock (one of [SQLITE_LOCK_NONE], [SQLITE_LOCK_SHARED],
** [SQLITE_LOCK_RESERVED], [SQLITE_LOCK_PENDING], or [SQLITE_LOCK_EXCLUSIVE])
** into an integer that the pArg argument points to. This capability
................................................................................
** Mutexes are created using [sqlite3_mutex_alloc()].
*/
typedef struct sqlite3_mutex sqlite3_mutex;

/*
** CAPI3REF: OS Interface Object {F11140}
**
** An instance of this object defines the interface between the
** SQLite core and the underlying operating system.  The "vfs"
** in the name of the object stands for "virtual file system".
**
** The iVersion field is initially 1 but may be larger for future
** versions of SQLite.  Additional fields may be appended to this
** object when the iVersion value is increased.
**
** The szOsFile field is the size of the subclassed [sqlite3_file]
** structure used by this VFS.  mxPathname is the maximum length of
** a pathname in this VFS.
**
** Registered sqlite3_vfs objects are kept on a linked list formed by
................................................................................
** filename if it needs to remember the filename for some reason.
**
** {F11142} The flags argument to xOpen() includes all bits set in
** the flags argument to [sqlite3_open_v2()].  Or if [sqlite3_open()]
** or [sqlite3_open16()] is used, then flags includes at least
** [SQLITE_OPEN_READWRITE] | [SQLITE_OPEN_CREATE]. {END}
** If xOpen() opens a file read-only then it sets *pOutFlags to
** include [SQLITE_OPEN_READONLY].  Other bits in *pOutFlags may be
** set.
** 
** {F11143} SQLite will also add one of the following flags to the xOpen()
** call, depending on the object being opened:
** 
** <ul>
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MAIN_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MAIN_JOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TEMP_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TEMP_JOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TRANSIENT_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_SUBJOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MASTER_JOURNAL]
** </ul> {END}
**
** The file I/O implementation can use the object type flags to
** changes the way it deals with files.  For example, an application
** that does not care about crash recovery or rollback might make
** the open of a journal file a no-op.  Writes to this journal would
** also be no-ops, and any attempt to read the journal would return 
** SQLITE_IOERR.  Or the implementation might recognize that a database 
** file will be doing page-aligned sector reads and writes in a random 
** order and set up its I/O subsystem accordingly.
** 
** SQLite might also add one of the following flags to the xOpen
** method:
** 
** <ul>
** <li> [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE]
** <li> [SQLITE_OPEN_EXCLUSIVE]
** </ul>
** 
** {F11145} The [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE] flag means the file should be
** deleted when it is closed.  {F11146} The [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE]
** will be set for TEMP  databases, journals and for subjournals. 
** {F11147} The [SQLITE_OPEN_EXCLUSIVE] flag means the file should be opened
** for exclusive access.  This flag is set for all files except
** for the main database file. {END}
** 
** {F11148} At least szOsFile bytes of memory are allocated by SQLite 
** to hold the  [sqlite3_file] structure passed as the third 
** argument to xOpen.  {END}  The xOpen method does not have to
** allocate the structure; it should just fill it in.
** 
** {F11149} The flags argument to xAccess() may be [SQLITE_ACCESS_EXISTS] 
** to test for the existence of a file,
** or [SQLITE_ACCESS_READWRITE] to test to see
** if a file is readable and writable, or [SQLITE_ACCESS_READ]
** to test to see if a file is at least readable.  {END} The file can be a 
** directory.
** 
** {F11150} SQLite will always allocate at least mxPathname+1 bytes for
** the output buffer xFullPathname. {F11151} The exact
** size of the output buffer is also passed as a parameter to both 
** methods. {END} If the output buffer is not large enough, [SQLITE_CANTOPEN]
** should be returned. As this is handled as a fatal error by SQLite,
** vfs implementations should endeavor to prevent this by setting 
** mxPathname to a sufficiently large value.
** 
** The xRandomness(), xSleep(), and xCurrentTime() interfaces
** are not strictly a part of the filesystem, but they are
** included in the VFS structure for completeness.
** The xRandomness() function attempts to return nBytes bytes
** of good-quality randomness into zOut.  The return value is
** the actual number of bytes of randomness obtained.  The
** xSleep() method causes the calling thread to sleep for at
** least the number of microseconds given.  The xCurrentTime()
** method returns a Julian Day Number for the current date and
** time.
*/
typedef struct sqlite3_vfs sqlite3_vfs;
struct sqlite3_vfs {
  int iVersion;            /* Structure version number */
  int szOsFile;            /* Size of subclassed sqlite3_file */
  int mxPathname;          /* Maximum file pathname length */
  sqlite3_vfs *pNext;      /* Next registered VFS */







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** on how SQLite interfaces are suppose to operate.
**
** The name of this file under configuration management is "sqlite.h.in".
** The makefile makes some minor changes to this file (such as inserting
** the version number) and changes its name to "sqlite3.h" as
** part of the build process.
**
** @(#) $Id: sqlite.h.in,v 1.343 2008/06/21 06:16:43 mihailim Exp $
*/
#ifndef _SQLITE3_H_
#define _SQLITE3_H_
#include <stdarg.h>     /* Needed for the definition of va_list */

/*
** Make sure we can call this stuff from C++.
................................................................................
** Add the ability to override 'extern'
*/
#ifndef SQLITE_EXTERN
# define SQLITE_EXTERN extern
#endif

/*
** Ensure these symbols were not defined by some previous header file.

*/
#ifdef SQLITE_VERSION
# undef SQLITE_VERSION
#endif
#ifdef SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER
# undef SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER
#endif
................................................................................
** The SQLITE_VERSION and SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER #defines in
** the sqlite3.h file specify the version of SQLite with which
** that header file is associated.
**
** The "version" of SQLite is a string of the form "X.Y.Z".
** The phrase "alpha" or "beta" might be appended after the Z.
** The X value is major version number always 3 in SQLite3.
** The X value only changes when backwards compatibility is
** broken and we intend to never break backwards compatibility.
** The Y value is the minor version number and only changes when

** there are major feature enhancements that are forwards compatible
** but not backwards compatible.
** The Z value is the release number and is incremented with
** each release but resets back to 0 whenever Y is incremented.
**
** See also: [sqlite3_libversion()] and [sqlite3_libversion_number()].
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10011} The SQLITE_VERSION #define in the sqlite3.h header file
**          evaluates to a string literal that is the SQLite version
**          with which the header file is associated.
**
** {F10014} The SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER #define resolves to an integer
**          with the value (X*1000000 + Y*1000 + Z) where X, Y, and Z
**          are the major version, minor version, and release number.
*/
#define SQLITE_VERSION         "--VERS--"
#define SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER  --VERSION-NUMBER--

/*
** CAPI3REF: Run-Time Library Version Numbers {F10020}
** KEYWORDS: sqlite3_version
**
** These features provide the same information as the [SQLITE_VERSION]
** and [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER] #defines in the header, but are associated
** with the library instead of the header file.  Cautious programmers might
** include a check in their application to verify that
** sqlite3_libversion_number() always returns the value
** [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER].
**
** The sqlite3_libversion() function returns the same information as is
** in the sqlite3_version[] string constant.  The function is provided
** for use in DLLs since DLL users usually do not have direct access to string
** constants within the DLL.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10021} The [sqlite3_libversion_number()] interface returns
**          an integer equal to [SQLITE_VERSION_NUMBER].
**
** {F10022} The [sqlite3_version] string constant contains
**          the text of the [SQLITE_VERSION] string.
**
** {F10023} The [sqlite3_libversion()] function returns
**          a pointer to the [sqlite3_version] string constant.
*/
SQLITE_EXTERN const char sqlite3_version[];
const char *sqlite3_libversion(void);
int sqlite3_libversion_number(void);
................................................................................
/*
** CAPI3REF: Test To See If The Library Is Threadsafe {F10100}
**
** SQLite can be compiled with or without mutexes.  When
** the SQLITE_THREADSAFE C preprocessor macro is true, mutexes
** are enabled and SQLite is threadsafe.  When that macro is false,
** the mutexes are omitted.  Without the mutexes, it is not safe
** to use SQLite concurrently from more than one thread.
**
** Enabling mutexes incurs a measurable performance penalty.
** So if speed is of utmost importance, it makes sense to disable
** the mutexes.  But for maximum safety, mutexes should be enabled.
** The default behavior is for mutexes to be enabled.
**
** This interface can be used by a program to make sure that the
** version of SQLite that it is linking against was compiled with
** the desired setting of the SQLITE_THREADSAFE macro.
................................................................................
**
** {F10101} The [sqlite3_threadsafe()] function returns nonzero if
**          SQLite was compiled with its mutexes enabled or zero
**          if SQLite was compiled with mutexes disabled.
*/
int sqlite3_threadsafe(void);


/*
** CAPI3REF: Database Connection Handle {F12000}
** KEYWORDS: {database connection} {database connections}
**
** Each open SQLite database is represented by a pointer to an instance of
** the opaque structure named "sqlite3".  It is useful to think of an sqlite3
** pointer as an object.  The [sqlite3_open()], [sqlite3_open16()], and
** [sqlite3_open_v2()] interfaces are its constructors, and [sqlite3_close()]
** is its destructor.  There are many other interfaces (such as
** [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_create_function()], and
** [sqlite3_busy_timeout()] to name but three) that are methods on an
** sqlite3 object.
*/
typedef struct sqlite3 sqlite3;


/*
** CAPI3REF: 64-Bit Integer Types {F10200}
** KEYWORDS: sqlite_int64 sqlite_uint64
**
** Because there is no cross-platform way to specify 64-bit integer types
** SQLite includes typedefs for 64-bit signed and unsigned integers.
**
** The sqlite3_int64 and sqlite3_uint64 are the preferred type definitions.
** The sqlite_int64 and sqlite_uint64 types are supported for backwards
** compatibility only.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F10201} The [sqlite_int64] and [sqlite3_int64] types specify
**          a 64-bit signed integer.
**
** {F10202} The [sqlite_uint64] and [sqlite3_uint64] types specify
**          a 64-bit unsigned integer.
*/
#ifdef SQLITE_INT64_TYPE
  typedef SQLITE_INT64_TYPE sqlite_int64;
  typedef unsigned SQLITE_INT64_TYPE sqlite_uint64;
................................................................................
  typedef unsigned long long int sqlite_uint64;
#endif
typedef sqlite_int64 sqlite3_int64;
typedef sqlite_uint64 sqlite3_uint64;

/*
** If compiling for a processor that lacks floating point support,
** substitute integer for floating-point.
*/
#ifdef SQLITE_OMIT_FLOATING_POINT
# define double sqlite3_int64
#endif

/*
** CAPI3REF: Closing A Database Connection {F12010}
**
** This routine is the destructor for the [sqlite3] object.
**
** Applications should [sqlite3_finalize | finalize] all [prepared statements]

** and [sqlite3_blob_close | close] all [sqlite3_blob | BLOBs] associated with
** the [sqlite3] object prior to attempting to close the object.

** The [sqlite3_next_stmt()] interface can be used to locate all
** [prepared statements] associated with a [database connection] if desired.
** Typical code might look like this:
**
** <blockquote><pre>
** sqlite3_stmt *pStmt;
** while( (pStmt = sqlite3_next_stmt(db, 0))!=0 ){
** &nbsp;   sqlite3_finalize(pStmt);
** }
** </pre></blockquote>
**
** If [sqlite3_close()] is invoked while a transaction is open,
** the transaction is automatically rolled back.
**
** INVARIANTS:
**
** {F12011} The [sqlite3_close()] interface destroys an [sqlite3] object
**          allocated by a prior call to [sqlite3_open()],
**          [sqlite3_open16()], or [sqlite3_open_v2()].
**
** {F12012} The [sqlite3_close()] function releases all memory used by the
**          connection and closes all open files.
**
** {F12013} If the database connection contains [prepared statements] that
**          have not been [sqlite3_finalize | finalized],
**          then [sqlite3_close()] returns [SQLITE_BUSY] and leaves
**          the connection open.
**
** {F12014} Passing sqlite3_close() a NULL pointer is a harmless no-op.
**
** {F12019} When [sqlite3_close()] is invoked on a [database connection]
**          that has a pending transaction, the transaction shall be
**          rolled back.
**
** LIMITATIONS:
**
** {U12015} The parameter to [sqlite3_close()] must be an [sqlite3] object
**          pointer previously obtained from [sqlite3_open()] or the
**          equivalent, or NULL.
**
** {U12016} The parameter to [sqlite3_close()] must not have been previously
**          closed.
*/
int sqlite3_close(sqlite3 *);

................................................................................
** compatibility and is not documented.
*/
typedef int (*sqlite3_callback)(void*,int,char**, char**);

/*
** CAPI3REF: One-Step Query Execution Interface {F12100}
**
** The sqlite3_exec() interface is a convenient way of running one or more
** SQL statements without having to write a lot of C code.  The UTF-8 encoded
** SQL statements are passed in as the second parameter to sqlite3_exec().
** The statements are evaluated one by one until either an error or

** an interrupt is encountered, or until they are all done.  The 3rd parameter
** is an optional callback that is invoked once for each row of any query
** results produced by the SQL statements.  The 5th parameter tells where
** to write any error messages.
**
** The error message passed back through the 5th parameter is held
** in memory obtained from [sqlite3_malloc()].  To avoid a memory leak,
** the calling application should call [sqlite3_free()] on any error
** message returned through the 5th parameter when it has finished using
** the error message.
**
** If the SQL statement in the 2nd parameter is NULL or an empty string
** or a string containing only whitespace and comments, then no SQL
** statements are evaluated and the database is not changed.
**
** The sqlite3_exec() interface is implemented in terms of
** [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_step()], and [sqlite3_finalize()].
** The sqlite3_exec() routine does nothing to the database that cannot be done
** by [sqlite3_prepare_v2()], [sqlite3_step()], and [sqlite3_finalize()].
**
** INVARIANTS:
** 
** {F12101} A successful invocation of [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)]
**          shall evaluate all of the UTF-8 encoded, semicolon-separated
**          SQL statements in the zero-terminated string S within the
**          context of the [database connection] D.
**
** {F12102} If the S parameter to [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] is NULL then
**          the actions of the interface shall be the same as if the
**          S parameter were an empty string.
**
** {F12104} The return value of [sqlite3_exec()] shall be [SQLITE_OK] if all
**          SQL statements run successfully and to completion.
**
** {F12105} The return value of [sqlite3_exec()] shall be an appropriate 
**          non-zero [error code] if any SQL statement fails.
**
................................................................................
** {F12134} The [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] routine shall set the value of
**          *E to NULL if E is not NULL and there are no errors.
**
** {F12137} The [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] function shall set the error code
**          and message accessible via [sqlite3_errcode()],
**          [sqlite3_errmsg()], and [sqlite3_errmsg16()].
**
** {F12138} If the S parameter to [sqlite3_exec(D,S,C,A,E)] is NULL or an
**          empty string or contains nothing other than whitespace, comments,
**          and/or semicolons, then results of [sqlite3_errcode()],
**          [sqlite3_errmsg()], and [sqlite3_errmsg16()]
**          shall reset to indicate no errors.
**
** LIMITATIONS:
**
** {U12141} The first parameter to [sqlite3_exec()] must be an valid and open
**          [database connection].
................................................................................

/*
** CAPI3REF: Extended Result Codes {F10220}
** KEYWORDS: {extended error code} {extended error codes}
** KEYWORDS: {extended result codes}
**
** In its default configuration, SQLite API routines return one of 26 integer
** [SQLITE_OK | result codes].  However, experience has shown that many of
** these result codes are too coarse-grained.  They do not provide as
** much information about problems as programmers might like.  In an effort to
** address this, newer versions of SQLite (version 3.3.8 and later) include
** support for additional result codes that provide more detailed information
** about errors. The extended result codes are enabled or disabled
** on a per database connection basis using the
** [sqlite3_extended_result_codes()] API.
** 
** Some of the available extended result codes are listed here.
** One may expect the number of extended result codes will be expand
** over time.  Software that uses extended result codes should expect
** to see new result codes in future releases of SQLite.
**
** The SQLITE_OK result code will never be extended.  It will always
................................................................................
** to use normal fsync() semantics. The SQLITE_SYNC_FULL flag means 
** to use Mac OS-X style fullsync instead of fsync().
*/
#define SQLITE_SYNC_NORMAL        0x00002
#define SQLITE_SYNC_FULL          0x00003
#define SQLITE_SYNC_DATAONLY      0x00010


/*
** CAPI3REF: OS Interface Open File Handle {F11110}
**
** An [sqlite3_file] object represents an open file in the OS
** interface layer.  Individual OS interface implementations will
** want to subclass this object by appending additional fields
** for their own use.  The pMethods entry is a pointer to an
................................................................................
**
** Every file opened by the [sqlite3_vfs] xOpen method contains a pointer to
** an instance of this object.  This object defines the
** methods used to perform various operations against the open file.
**
** The flags argument to xSync may be one of [SQLITE_SYNC_NORMAL] or
** [SQLITE_SYNC_FULL].  The first choice is the normal fsync().
** The second choice is a Mac OS-X style fullsync.  The [SQLITE_SYNC_DATAONLY]
** flag may be ORed in to indicate that only the data of the file
** and not its inode needs to be synced.

** 
** The integer values to xLock() and xUnlock() are one of
** <ul>
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_NONE],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_SHARED],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_RESERVED],
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_PENDING], or
** <li> [SQLITE_LOCK_EXCLUSIVE].
** </ul>
** xLock() increases the lock. xUnlock() decreases the lock.  
** The xCheckReservedLock() method checks whether any database connection,

** either in this process or in some other process, is holding a RESERVED,
** PENDING, or EXCLUSIVE lock on the file.  It returns true
** if such a lock exists and false otherwise.
** 
** The xFileControl() method is a generic interface that allows custom
** VFS implementations to directly control an open file using the
** [sqlite3_file_control()] interface.  The second "op" argument is an
** integer opcode.   The third argument is a generic pointer intended to

** point to a structure that may contain arguments or space in which to
** write return values.  Potential uses for xFileControl() might be
** functions to enable blocking locks with timeouts, to change the
** locking strategy (for example to use dot-file locks), to inquire
** about the status of a lock, or to break stale locks.  The SQLite
** core reserves all opcodes less than 100 for its own use. 
** A [SQLITE_FCNTL_LOCKSTATE | list of opcodes] less than 100 is available.
** Applications that define a custom xFileControl method should use opcodes
** greater than 100 to avoid conflicts.
**
** The xSectorSize() method returns the sector size of the
** device that underlies the file.  The sector size is the
** minimum write that can be performed without disturbing
** other bytes in the file.  The xDeviceCharacteristics()
** method returns a bit vector describing behaviors of the
................................................................................
  /* Additional methods may be added in future releases */
};

/*
** CAPI3REF: Standard File Control Opcodes {F11310}
**
** These integer constants are opcodes for the xFileControl method
** of the [sqlite3_io_methods] object and for the [sqlite3_file_control()]
** interface.
**
** The [SQLITE_FCNTL_LOCKSTATE] opcode is used for debugging.  This
** opcode causes the xFileControl method to write the current state of
** the lock (one of [SQLITE_LOCK_NONE], [SQLITE_LOCK_SHARED],
** [SQLITE_LOCK_RESERVED], [SQLITE_LOCK_PENDING], or [SQLITE_LOCK_EXCLUSIVE])
** into an integer that the pArg argument points to. This capability
................................................................................
** Mutexes are created using [sqlite3_mutex_alloc()].
*/
typedef struct sqlite3_mutex sqlite3_mutex;

/*
** CAPI3REF: OS Interface Object {F11140}
**
** An instance of the sqlite3_vfs object defines the interface between
** the SQLite core and the underlying operating system.  The "vfs"
** in the name of the object stands for "virtual file system".
**
** The value of the iVersion field is initially 1 but may be larger in
** future versions of SQLite.  Additional fields may be appended to this
** object when the iVersion value is increased.
**
** The szOsFile field is the size of the subclassed [sqlite3_file]
** structure used by this VFS.  mxPathname is the maximum length of
** a pathname in this VFS.
**
** Registered sqlite3_vfs objects are kept on a linked list formed by
................................................................................
** filename if it needs to remember the filename for some reason.
**
** {F11142} The flags argument to xOpen() includes all bits set in
** the flags argument to [sqlite3_open_v2()].  Or if [sqlite3_open()]
** or [sqlite3_open16()] is used, then flags includes at least
** [SQLITE_OPEN_READWRITE] | [SQLITE_OPEN_CREATE]. {END}
** If xOpen() opens a file read-only then it sets *pOutFlags to
** include [SQLITE_OPEN_READONLY].  Other bits in *pOutFlags may be set.

**
** {F11143} SQLite will also add one of the following flags to the xOpen()
** call, depending on the object being opened:
**
** <ul>
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MAIN_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MAIN_JOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TEMP_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TEMP_JOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_TRANSIENT_DB]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_SUBJOURNAL]
** <li>  [SQLITE_OPEN_MASTER_JOURNAL]
** </ul> {END}
**
** The file I/O implementation can use the object type flags to
** change the way it deals with files.  For example, an application
** that does not care about crash recovery or rollback might make
** the open of a journal file a no-op.  Writes to this journal would
** also be no-ops, and any attempt to read the journal would return
** SQLITE_IOERR.  Or the implementation might recognize that a database
** file will be doing page-aligned sector reads and writes in a random
** order and set up its I/O subsystem accordingly.
**
** SQLite might also add one of the following flags to the xOpen method:

**
** <ul>
** <li> [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE]
** <li> [SQLITE_OPEN_EXCLUSIVE]
** </ul>
**
** {F11145} The [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE] flag means the file should be
** deleted when it is closed.  {F11146} The [SQLITE_OPEN_DELETEONCLOSE]
** will be set for TEMP  databases, journals and for subjournals.
** {F11147} The [SQLITE_OPEN_EXCLUSIVE] flag means the file should be opened
** for exclusive access.  This flag is set for all files except
** for the main database file. {END}
**
** {F11148} At least szOsFile bytes of memory are allocated by SQLite
** to hold the  [sqlite3_file] structure passed as the third
** argument to xOpen.  {END}  The xOpen method does not have to
** allocate the structure; it should just fill it in.
**
** {F11149} The flags argument to xAccess() may be [SQLITE_ACCESS_EXISTS]
** to test for the existence of a file, or [SQLITE_ACCESS_READWRITE] to

** test whether a file is readable and writable, or [SQLITE_ACCESS_READ]
** to test whether a file is at least readable.  {END} The file can be a
** directory.
**
** {F11150} SQLite will always allocate at least mxPathname+1 bytes for the
** output buffer xFullPathname. {F11151} The exact size of the output buffer
** is also passed as a parameter to both  methods. {END} If the output buffer
** is not large enough, [SQLITE_CANTOPEN] should be returned. Since this is
** handled as a fatal error by SQLite, vfs implementations should endeavor

** to prevent this by setting mxPathname to a sufficiently large value.
**
** The xRandomness(), xSleep(), and xCurrentTime() interfaces
** are not strictly a part of the filesystem, but they are
** included in the VFS structure for completeness.
** The xRandomness() function attempts to return nBytes bytes
** of good-quality randomness into zOut.  The return value is
** the actual number of bytes of randomness obtained.
** The xSleep() method causes the calling thread to sleep for at
** least the number of microseconds given.  The xCurrentTime()
** method returns a Julian Day Number for the current date and time.

*/
typedef struct sqlite3_vfs sqlite3_vfs;
struct sqlite3_vfs {
  int iVersion;            /* Structure version number */
  int szOsFile;            /* Size of subclassed sqlite3_file */
  int mxPathname;          /* Maximum file pathname length */
  sqlite3_vfs *pNext;      /* Next registered VFS */